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06/07/2013 at 21:37

@ JDVS If you're water is metered, there are scarecrow cat repellents that use a integral water supply, handy if you cannot get a hose to the garden easily or permanantly, of if you are on a metered supply. You can check it out at http://catrepellentguide.com/ultrasonic-cat-repellents/guardener-a201-2-0/ hope that helps!

07/07/2013 at 08:51

So many great ideas.

Firstly have you informed your neighbours of your problem? Its thier problems too - is it not! Do they have litter trays for thier cats?

I like the idea someone mentioned earlier that just have no ground left uncovered and plant like mad.

 

16/09/2013 at 17:08

I've used the sonic cat scarers which seem to work - although not all the time. Definitely reduced the number of nasty surprises. And they dont seem to like Strulch - which is a mineralised straw mulch. I used it on my garden for the first time this year to suppress weeds and reduce water evaporation, and an unexpected bonus has been a drastic reduction in cat activity. Prior to application, there was at least one cat regularly digging up plants and leaving smelly parcels. As soon as the Strulch went down, the digging stopped. Once you first put it down it is a bit funky smelling, but this fades. Could simply be more proof that cats don't like "smelly things"

16/09/2013 at 17:24

All the previous suggestions might work in garden areas, but any ideas for how to stop them leaving their calling cards on the lawn??

16/09/2013 at 17:58

I had that prob - carefully positioned sonic cat scarer worked. I still get the odd calling card - presumably from a deaf cat passing through - but much less. I was literally scraping it off every day or so, now it's once every few months perhaps? Sonic cat scarers also deter foxes who will of course do their business anywhere. I've also had the pleasure of cleaning up after someone's dog which decided to foul the lawn in my front garden (I'm in London). Cat owers can't really do much about their cats once they leave the house, but what sort of person lets their dog do that? Honestly! Cat scarer seems to have put a stop to that as well, thank heavens.

16/09/2013 at 18:37

The sonic scarers sound like they're worth a try.  Any specific recommendations as there seem to be a number of products on the market.  As the lawn is 100' x 30' I guess I need more than one

16/09/2013 at 19:16

Just a note to say that, although they aren't usually audible to adult humans, children can often hear them and find them distressingly piercing.

16/09/2013 at 19:18
it is now over 7 months since i started to spray Jeyes fluid either ready to use or tin, only one deposit in the time due to Kate planting and forgetting to spray around the turned soil, worked for us
16/09/2013 at 22:07

Fair comment about the problems sonic scarers might cause children but thankfully we don't have any and neither do our neighbours.  There was one in the house behind us a few years ago and her screaming in the garden probably scared off every living thing in a half mile radius.  They certainly made our garden much less pleasurable on a sunny evening!

16/09/2013 at 22:49

I tried the teabags dipped in Jeyes fluid down a very narrow pathway & watched one moggy step straight over it.

Just bought some Deep Heat, will try shortly.

We also have a sonic thing but maybe the cats are deaf.

17/09/2013 at 01:41

I've tried them sonic scarer the cats came and put their heads in it. Was not bothered by it at all. I got my own cat, they dont mess in their own garden and won't allow other cats to do so. Get a cat.

17/09/2013 at 09:45

Er, Florence, if your cats don't mess in their own garden, whose do they use?

06/12/2013 at 10:49

Barring a shotgun, there is only ONE deterrent to stop cats from defecating ( to put it politely ) on your garden. Believe me, I've  spent far too much  cash on those CRAP electronic so-called cat scarers.   Save your money, full stop !!. Invest in a simple little, harmless, "electric cat fence" that can be purchased for around £40-£50. which is less than some of the silly electronic devices that I see advertised all over the net by some suppliers, including the RSPB. !.  Take your time to carefully set it up,( about twenty minutes for a small garden  )  it's not rocket science, but a little time spent reading the simple instructions and doing the job properly will bring the results that you pay for, guaranteed !!, no if's or but's, guaranteed. . Loads of suppliers on the net, including EBAY, AMAZON, etc. In just three nights I stopped the antics of no less than FIVE cats that had been  defecating ON A REGULAR BASIS all over my vegetable garden for the last twelve months. All this was recorded on my cctv system, and not one of the moggies that received the small electric shock have  been spotted  here since. A little 12 volt car battery will run this simple system  for about six weeks before needing a recharge., but you'll find that after each cat has had a taste of the juice you only need to turn the power on ocasionally, just to keep them on their toes. Best £40 that I've ever spent. !!!.

08/12/2013 at 12:30

Chickens!!! Cats daren't come in the garden. The English Mastiff helps too 

08/12/2013 at 15:03

whoa! careful there buddy, cats can wander as they please under the current law

08/12/2013 at 16:08

I've tried chilli powder with some success. In my experience what ever spray repellent you use, its ok for a few mths then they come back again! I will try the holly and see what happens.

08/12/2013 at 17:36

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/34991.jpg?width=480&height=350&mode=max

 To add fuel to the fire re: cat deterrent devices that do /donot work...

The 'cut-out cat' silhouette designs shown in various gardening mags struck me as 'probaby a good idea', but hellishly expensive AND I'd rather make my own from a lino offcut, matt black emulsion paint (two thick coats on both sides) and two jewel-like cats-eyes used in the bottom of plant pot outers for drainage... (or use clear glas marbles and two or three dabs of superglue.

"Mogg1" and "Mogg2" etc are still 'on guard' in the garden two years down the line.

I made three and placed them strategically around my garden, propped up with three lengths of bamboo - two to one side & one on 'tother. *I keep a 'spare' one in our downstairsbathroom window, just to give the impression that there's a ferocious 'mog' resident in the house too!

Cat 'incursion' + 'presents' still occurs,every now and then. I aso use holly, berberis, cotoneaster clippings ....on troughs, tubs & freshly-turned/ planted soil areas......do you get my 'point'??

08/12/2013 at 21:32

Dog owners are obliged to clean up after their pets and it should certainly  be no different with cats. I have asked the owners of the cats that I caught on camera in the past to come and clean up the mess, no chance !!. I don't think it's appreciated by cat  owners that their cat excrement can cause obnoxious things to chilldren, like blindness etc,  Why, I wonder are cats allowed the free run of the place when all other pets are restricted ?. Until the law changes on this, and I believe it will change  in the next year or so,  I will use any means to keep the filthy things out of my property.

08/12/2013 at 21:49

Domestic cats are protected by law and it is an offence to trap, injure or kill them.

09/12/2013 at 09:43
waterbutts wrote (see)

Just a note to say that, although they aren't usually audible to adult humans, children can often hear them and find them distressingly piercing.

My partners neighbour had one of these electric noise machines installed to scare off rats. Despite my being 25 years at the time the first time I pulled up and got out of the car the pain it caused my ears made me drop to the floor! It was unbearable to have a window open in his house and I'd be in tears by the time I got to his front door some days! Similar machines are often used in town centres to stop "youth" gathering at night.

I'm afraid I've nothing to add to how to scare cats, it seems to depend on the individual animal as to whether they're threatened by noises / smells (though most will react to a water pistol so perhaps motion activated sensors are the way?)

Are the certain plants that give off smells a cat doesn't enjoy? Google seems to suggest something called "rue" but I don't admit to knowing what it is. Is there a mulch they can't stand?

Perhaps you would be better to guerilla bomb the gardens of those with cats with the likes of catnip / grass to encourage their cats to stay in their own gardens.

What it is perfectly clear (in terms of the law at least) that you can't do however is actively put things down intended to threaten their life (aka no matter what your personal thoughts are cats are not classed as vermin and thus can not be destroyed). Police will act if they are informed that you are putting down poisons such as de-icer for the intent of killing an animal.

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