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9 messages
09/04/2014 at 12:14

As some of you will know, I had my back garden completely re-landscaped last year, including a lovely new lawn, so was gutted to find it full of worm casts this spring  .  It has had one mowing 3 weeks ago, but now badly needs doing again.  The trouble is, we've had so much rain over the past ten days that the mud doesn't dry off sufficiently to be raked off.  The rest of this week is supposed to be dry, so I would really value some advice on how to deal with this problem.  I'll attach a pic to show you a typical little pile, but this is repeated time and time again.

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/41889.jpg?width=272&height=350&mode=max

 

 

09/04/2014 at 12:18

Brush them off with a stiff yard broom or besom  and then mow the lawn as usual, but with the cutter bar on a higher setting.

Aerate the lawn (stabbing all over as deeply as you can with a garden fork will do - mind your feet!) - this will improve the drainage and the worms will move lower in the soil. 

09/04/2014 at 13:23

There was something about this on Garden Mania (or something like that) on BBC radio Newcastle recently - i think its still on I player - they were talking about some organic solution you can spay on your lawn that has some sulphur in it or something that the worms don't like. thats also supposed to make them go deeper and get rid of the casts. 

09/04/2014 at 21:40

Worm casts are supposed to be the MOST wonderful soil/growing medium?

09/04/2014 at 22:17
artjak wrote (see)

Worm casts are supposed to be the MOST wonderful soil/growing medium?

True, but when they get wet they turn to mud just like the rest of the soil underneath. So If you try and brush wet worm casts it sticks like glue or smears all over the lawn.

09/04/2014 at 23:02

Having supervised the care and maintenance of bowling greens.   Worm cast was always a nightmare. The shwising stick was the tool.  It was a long cane that was gently brushed back and forth.  Often used was, Mowran meal.  This was spread all over.  Sadly it killed the worms, some of our more valuable earth friends.

10/04/2014 at 21:34

Went into the GC today looking for a besom broom, and they'd actually got some in the Sale.  So I got a Joseph Bentley one for £3.75 - lucky me!  So I shall attack the worm casts tomorrow.  Do you think the besom will work better if I trim all the birch twigs to roughly the same length?

10/04/2014 at 21:46

Those wispy ends are good hc. Use it when the casts are dry or you'll get a mess

13/04/2014 at 22:01

Didn't have much joy with the besom, partly because by now the grass was above the casts, and also because even though the tops of the muddy piles were dry, the bottoms weren't. The broom just glided over the tops without moving them in the slightest!.  So with a little old kitchen knife I have begun to dig out the solid stuff (which has now been flattened by the lawnmower), flicking it onto the top of the grass.  When it dries it is much easier to sweep onto the patio with the besom.  But it's going to take a long, long time - which I haven't got at the moment.  

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