6 messages
02/10/2013 at 13:56

Hi Everyone,

I am new here, but wanted to ask you kind folk a question.

This has never happened before, but today, it seems out of nowhere, loads of 'mushrooms' have appeared in a certain area of our back garden, on the grass.

We have been here nearly 7 years and never had this before.

See pics:

http://s3.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/32007.jpeg?width=276&height=350&mode=max

 

http://s3.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/32008.jpeg?width=276&height=350&mode=max

 

http://s3.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/32009.jpeg?width=276&height=350&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/32010.jpg?width=276&height=350&mode=max

 Now as you can see, there is one of those sonic cat scarers down the end of the garden that the mushrooms have grown, which may just be a coincidence, but I am not so sure. Although there are a few mushrooms behind the direction of the sensor, 99% are in it's direct line of fire, which immits a high frequency to scare away the cats when the sensor is activated.

Do you think the sensor is the cause? And if not, what do you think is the cause, and what should we do to avoid it happening again?

Thanking you in advance.

Regards

Steven

02/10/2013 at 14:02

Have you cut a largish tree or shrub down?

The fungi will be growing on some rotten material such as old roots.

Nothing whatsoever to do with the cat scarer.

02/10/2013 at 14:06

No, not cut anything down. All I did was cut the grass last Friday, raked it up, and that was it, the same as we do a few times a year.

I had a look earlier and there does not seem to be anything for the mushrooms to grow on, the pull up quite easily, and have roots on them still.

 

02/10/2013 at 14:15

As Fidgetbones says, nothing at all to do with the cat scarer.  

Mushrooms of all varieties grow from mycellium which is below the ground surface all over the place.  Depending on the type of fungi and the time of year, and a combination of climatic conditions, the mycellium will produce it's fruiting bodies i.e. mushrooms.  

Nothing at all to worry about - just another glorious example of nature at its bountiful best at this time of year.

This year promises to be a very good one for fungi of all kinds.

 

Not possible to identify yours, so all you need to do is brush them away into the flowerbeds before you mow the lawn to avoid making a soggy mess on the lawn. They'll decompose in the borders and do no damage to anything. If you prefer you can gather them and put them on the compost heap or in the bin.

There's nothing you can or need do to prevent a recurrence another year.  They'll either appear or they won't - that's nature 

 

02/10/2013 at 14:24

Thanks. I wouldn't mind if they ate the grass around them, to save me from having to cut it. hehe.

I cut it last Friday hoping it would be the last time before winter sets in, and now it needs doing again

Thanks again.

02/10/2013 at 23:00

I blame the garden gnomes  

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