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10 messages
06/02/2014 at 11:54

I know I should probably be patient and wait 'til March, but I know the little bu**ers are out there and am itching to get some nematodes now!

It says the temp. needs to be 5 degrees C - do they mean in the ground, or the air temp? And is that at night?

We're currently hovering around the 5 degree mark at night, here in London.

Any thoughts much appreciated, as I need to get the large pack (£29 - ouch) and don't want to waste it. Thanks.

Edd
06/02/2014 at 12:07

A little more patience need, i would suggest March at the earliest. It is a short month, this one so hold on. We all want to get out there.

06/02/2014 at 12:08

 thanks Edd.

I'm hoping the grubs are still overwintering...but given the mild winter we've had so far, I'm not so sure...

Edd
06/02/2014 at 12:19

It is the soil temp of above 5ºC (40ºF) when the little buggers become active so you could test the soil temp if you really can't wait. Remember to store the nematodes in the fridge until needed but i am sure you know that already.

06/02/2014 at 13:51

Yes, thanks for the soil info though - guess I could shove a thermometer in there!

06/02/2014 at 19:05

Jess forget the soil thermometer.  You need to wait several weeks yet.  Nematodes will simply die now ..besides nobody will supply yet.

Imcreasingly I'm in the minority here but Provado vine weevil killer will work now.  It will kill those grubs regardless of soil temp or season.  

For me treatment with Provado to save your plants now is worth it.  Then you can revert to nematodes in late spring.  Then a cycle of spring and autumn nematodes every year. Works for me.  

07/02/2014 at 11:28

Thanks Verdun - yes, I recall your being one of the few provado promoters on here 

Whilst i wouldn't rule it out, especially if it saves plants ( I am fearing that the grubs are currently active, rather than overwintering, because it has been so mild), I am worried about the effect on the beds long-term.

Does provado stay in the plant for months after use, or not?

I don't really know the answer and googling it hasn't given me much info either.

Some of my plants are also herbs and many plants are in open soil, alongside many plants which are attractive to pollinators.

My greatest fear is that provado may remain in the plants or the soil long-term and work its way into the plant structure, thus harming pollinators months ahead.

If you or anyone could tell me that that doesn't happen, the I'd use it too 

Edd
07/02/2014 at 12:00
16/02/2014 at 20:21

Do you need a special kind of thermometer to measure soil temperature, I wonder?

After reading some of the posts here, I'm certainly getting some nematodes. The vine weevils have killed quite a few plants in my small garden (though not the vine, surprisingly), and I want to do something about them. They seem especially fond of raspberries, and last year attacked my Amelanchier.

16/02/2014 at 23:26

Still feel Provado is the answer.  It's supposed to be effective for just a few weeks.  Can't see how it would affect bees if used now.  

Nematodes may be the lomg term solution but they can cause problems too....didn't they destroy a football pitch recently eating the grass roots?  

If weevil damage is allowed to continue until nematodes can be used in spring there won't be any plants left to save 

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