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08/08/2012 at 22:02

Can anybody tell me why my rowan trees which were sat last year did not produce berries this year. 

08/08/2012 at 23:48

Sorry, what do you mean "sat last year"?

09/08/2012 at 07:00

Set?

Anyway, I have a rowan tree. It does have some berries on it, but far fewer than normal...

http://i849.photobucket.com/albums/ab51/falcosubbuteo/rowan1.jpg

But what is significant about the tree is that there are far fewer leaves than normal. This is particularly noticable if you stand under the tree, and look upwards...

http://i849.photobucket.com/albums/ab51/falcosubbuteo/rowan2.jpg

My guess is that the tree is in a bad way because of the very wet conditions we've been having for month's on end. But that is only a guess, and yours may be suffering from a quite different problem.

09/08/2012 at 07:18

If you mean that it was planted last year, my guess is that it's spent this growing season trying to establish a good root system (even plants have to prioritise, especially in bad growing years).  Give it time - the rowan is a hardy plant and as long as it's not in boggy ground it should be ok - remember it's at home on well-drained exposed hillsides 

http://www.walkingenglishman.com/leedsharrogate/23kirkbymalzeard/kirkbymalzeardmoor08.jpg

09/08/2012 at 07:49

Thanks for your replies.I guess I will have to be patient and wait and see. 

09/08/2012 at 08:07
Dovefromabove wrote (see)

... it's at home on well-drained exposed hillsides ...

That's really interesting, because I'm on a heavy clay soil, and the drainage is particularly poor.

Although Rowan is said to be a 'native' tree, they are not actually found in the wild environment in my area. They only occur where gardeners, like me, have bought them, and planted them!

Nature knows the best place to grow everything.

09/08/2012 at 09:08

Got it in one Gary - there are so many different soil types and conditions in the UK that just because something is described as 'native' it doesn't mean it's suitable for everywhere - on a clay soil I'd have gone for a crab apple or a hawthorn.  Similar size to the rowan, also with blossom and fruit and good wildlife value.

20/11/2012 at 19:12
22/11/2012 at 13:20

i have rowan trees 1 in my front garden and i in my back garden, and this year i have had more berries than ever, the trees where weighed down with them, they are also in heavy poor drain clay soil, i love seeing the blackbirds on them, i would like to know why the birds never seem to eat the berries that have dropped

24/11/2012 at 12:16

We have had a rowan tree 6 years now in well drained soil its very healthy and leaves are great but weve never had any berries , what is wrong .

24/11/2012 at 12:34

Have you had any flowers?

24/11/2012 at 12:44

No

 

24/11/2012 at 12:55

Just a matter of time I should think. If it looks healthy there can't be anything much wrong with it. Your'e not feeding it nitrogen to encouraging leaves at the expense of flowers are you?

24/11/2012 at 14:58

We put some on the grass do you think it may have blown , we will avoid doing it in future , but last year we applied it bcause the grass needed help and it looks healthy again now .

24/11/2012 at 15:05

If the tree is growing in the grass and the fertiliser was applied round it then it may have had an effect. I wouldn't worry about it. It'll flower eventually

24/11/2012 at 20:49

tree is in the border, thanks for your help .

05/06/2013 at 21:20

How do you encourage  growth on a sheerwater seedling rowan tree ? I have some that got damaged slightly by a strimmer-I cut back to good wood and applied sealant-I am now given to understand this is an outdated treatment,in fact it may hinder recovery-hence the enquiry -what can I do to promote or encourage this type of trees recovery? Thanks 

17/08/2013 at 15:27

My Rowan tree flowers really well but produces no berries. Why?

 

17/08/2013 at 16:12

glad to say my rowan trees are laden down with berries, they are in clay soil, but they are 15 years old 

03/09/2013 at 14:38

It seems to me that every rowan, all over the UK (it was the same in Plymouth as in Scotland) is absolutely laden with berries this year.     

 

Why is that?   Does it indicate a mild winter a-coming, or a frosty one?

1 to 20 of 24 messages