London (change)
Wed °C / °C
Tomorrow °C / °C
9 messages
15/05/2013 at 17:03

Could someone tell me what the green tenticles are growing out the base of my Pheonix Canariensis?

 

 Also, not sure if it doesn't like the lack of sun or too much, but we've cut all the drying out foliage so hard to tell if this will survive or not.

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/23589.jpg?width=204&height=350&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/23590.jpg?width=652&height=350&mode=max

 

15/05/2013 at 17:11

It's most likely objecting to dry air in the winter if it's been a heated room. Not sure about the tentacles - they may be roots, which might suggest it's pot bound or dry.

17/05/2013 at 08:48

Shouldn't be pot bound... I only moved it from the smaller pot we bought it into, to the larger pot a couple of weeks ago. Not sure if it was in a heated room at the garden centre, but it was outside and has now been moved into our porch which gets a lot of light but hardly any direct sun light (which is what the tag said were the conditions it liked). It may have overwatered it as the soil did take a long time to dry, so could this be it?

17/05/2013 at 08:50

Over watering is fatal to canariensis. They grow widely outside down here but mine were in too much damp shade. 

17/05/2013 at 08:51

Sorry, not clear - when was it outside? 

17/05/2013 at 09:11

Right, I think story time is in order (should have given this info in the beginning really)... About a month ago my wife came home from the Garden centre with a Phoenix Canariensis (which looked faily healthy) which the garden centre was selling off at a reduced price (which would ring alarm bells but they are a popular garden centre so gave benefit of the doubt). We potted this up straight away and was on our back, south-facing patio, for a couple of weeks, but all the foliage (despite watering and some spraying on the leaves) looked to be drying up and dying.

 To help the plant, we cut off all the foliage (as looking at the centre the plant wants to throw up some new foliage), and moved into the front porch, where it remains today. The top of the soil last weekend was still damp from when I watered it over two weeks before (which probably didn't help) but now is just starting to feel a bit drier. The plant may just be in a transition phase of something, but I am new to the world of Palms (we did buy a much healthier palm tree a couple of weeks ago which I have planted straight into the ground and looks good so far).

 One thing that has confused me though is the tag said "plenty of light, no direct sunlight" but some articles on the internet say "Full Sun". What are the best conditions?

17/05/2013 at 20:25

My guess is that somewhere along the line, either just before or just after you bought it, it got quite chilled.  It had probably been somewhere quite sheltered at the GC, so the leaves were a little tender.  When it got chilled the leaves were damaged and died.

Hopefully it didn't get chilled enough to damage the main stem or roots - it is fairly hardy, but if plants are in pots their hardiness is reduced, ditto if they've been in a sheltered environment and they've put on some soft growth.

If your patio at the back is south-facing, then your front porch faces north - am I right?  Is this a fully glazed porch or open to the elements?  I'm worried that it's still too chilly at the moment, especially if it's feet are quite wet.  I'd be very tempted to take it indoors and put it on a southfacing windowsill - let the pot dry out a bit and see what happens - if it revives then, when the weather warms up a bit, harden it off gently as you would tender bedding plants, before putting it in the garden full time.

As for the situation - I think it will cope with either situation provided it is introduced to bright sunlight slowly - tender lush growth will scorch if put in bright sunlight too soon.

Good luck. 

18/05/2013 at 01:50

Hi hunter

The green shoots are more than likely weeds, are the leaves tough, they wont be roots, mine did exactly the same.  I agree with Dove, at GC it was sheltered and then when it was moved it was shocked.  DON'T WORRY though, it will survive.  Contrary to a lot of peoples belief canary palms prefer there roots to be a bit more compact, they are very slow growing about 2 - 3 leaves per year and do not need to be in full sun to thrive, mine gets about 4 hours (when the sun is out) and it grows absolutely fine.  Treating them mean keeps them keen, they really do not need a lot of care or water, just let it do it's thing

Strange question - did you ensure the pot you put it in has plenty of drainage?  Also have you repotted into a plastic or ceramic/terracotta pot, if its the latter revert to plastic it is much better in the winter as terracotta and ceramic gets very cold and stays cold which could harm roots.

I would also suggest that you don't bring it in in the winter, just keep it sheltered outside. They are quite hardy plants. As Dove said though as it looks a bit poorly harden it off until your areas risk of frost has passed.

20/05/2013 at 10:10

Front porch is a fully glazed, north facing porch (so plenty of indirect light and completely unexposed to the elements). The pot is a plastic one, but can't remember just how much I put at the bottom for drainage. I think I will take both of your advice and place it in a south-facing window, then as the weather improves maybe put it outdoors in a part-shade position and see what happens .

email image
9 messages