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09/06/2013 at 09:51

Please can anybody help? I have 2 different types of spots on my tomato plant leaves. Some have yellow and some have brown. Help is much appreciated  

09/06/2013 at 09:53

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/25086.jpg?width=272&height=350&mode=max

 

09/06/2013 at 09:55

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/25088.jpg?width=272&height=350&mode=max

 

09/06/2013 at 10:01

That looks like blight to me. If you're not sure take a leaf and show it to a professional - at a nursery for instance. Others here will surely confirm or deny but I've lost both potatoes and tomatoes to it in the past 

09/06/2013 at 10:09

Thank you for your reply. I asume there is no cure for blight then as you lost yours to it?

09/06/2013 at 10:20

There isn't I'm afraid and it will mean that you'll have to pull them all up, it's highly cantagious. Don't put plants in a composter but burn them if possible. Do double-check and wait for others to reply to your thread tho cos I' m no expert

09/06/2013 at 10:46

Danielle, the necrotic - white/fawn - tissue in the first photo doesn't necessarily mean "blight".

"Blight" has become a generic term for all fungal diseases. In reality, there are two "Blight" diseases - Early and Late. There are other fungal diseases that can look somewhat like them. Early Blight is the most common fungal disease in the domestic garden, with Septoria Leaf Spot probably next on the list.

This is what Early Blight looks like in its early and later stages:

http://s3.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/25094.jpg?width=85&height=115&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/25095.jpg?width=350&height=300&mode=max

Notice the "bullseye" appearance of the spot in the first image. I think I can see one or two of them in your first photo. The extent of the necrotic tissue, though, isn't necessarily consistent with a fungal problem. You can get that result from things like fertiliser burn, particularly too much nitrogen. Are you fertilising the plant? And what with?

Can you take another, much closer photo of the smudge/stains on the leaves in your second photo?

09/06/2013 at 11:07

Definitely doesn't look like blight to me. Your plants will be ok. Probably due to extreme hot and cold temperatures and water splashes.

09/06/2013 at 11:36

People need to relax about tomato growing -99% of the time it is nothing to be concerned about -there is too much misinformation there

And the last thing a nurseryman wants is someone carting in a supposed diseased leaf-as has been said it is growing conditions.

Keep calm and carry on

09/06/2013 at 13:26

Thank you for all of your replies. Italophile, I have taken two more photos which are closer to the plant - please see below. Also I have been watering them with water and multi purpose miracle gro. Look forward to your reply

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/25124.jpg?width=272&height=350&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/25125.jpg?width=272&height=350&mode=max

 

09/06/2013 at 13:32

Doesn't look like blight to me - more like some sort of scorch - possibly caused by not hardening them off sufficiently and the growth being too soft - particularly if you've been feeding them.  Toms don't need feeding until the first truss of flowers has set fruit.

And even if it is blight, don't panic, some of mine had blight last year and I still had a crop from them.  Quarantine them from other plants and remove and burn every affected leaflet - inspecting morning and evening.  That's what I did and I got a reasonable crop of beefsteak tomatoes in a shocking year.

09/06/2013 at 13:39

Danielle, the first one - with all the necrotic tissue - doesn't look fungal. It's something cultural. As Dov says, knock off the fertiliser and cut back on watering too.

The second one could be more problematic. Have a very close look. Can you see little blisters/pustules at the centre of the marks?

09/06/2013 at 14:04

In the first photo, are the leaves on that plant quite thin and 'papery'? My plants got like that on the lower branches because of being kept inside for a bit too long (they weren't getting enough light but because of the cold at the time I didn't want to plant them out.)

With advice from italophile - as usual - I buried them deep into their final 25 litre pots, cutting off the lower branches. I did leave a few of the thin papery leaved branches as I didn't want to take off too much growth and they're still there now the plants are outside but they do in parts look like your first photo - the wind has whipped through the leaves and worn them down. 

I'm not worried as all of the new growth coming through is a brilliant green (as opposed to the yelllowy lower branches, and eventually I'll cut those off anyway

09/06/2013 at 14:21

Looking at the size pot, the plant with the purple marks on it's leaf, probably could do with a bigger pot. When I don't pot on tomato plants quickly enough or they get a chilled on a night....some varieties show these classic symptoms. But they soon disappear when put into their final 25lt tubs and continue to grow into strong plants.

Seriously, these plants are fine.

09/06/2013 at 15:05

Thank you so much for your help all! I shall cut off the affected leaves and repot and also leave off the fertiliser for a while.

Italophile - I can't see any blisters on top of the brown spots - they all seem the same solid colour??

 

09/06/2013 at 15:14

Okay, Danielle, I thought I could see some amongst the patches. That's a computer monitor for you! Just out of interest, what varieties are they?

09/06/2013 at 15:23

danielle, are those splodges a purplish colour? are the backs of the leaves at all purple or the stem?

09/06/2013 at 18:02

In the first photo, are the leaves on that plant quite thin and 'papery'? My plants got like that on the lower branches because of being kept inside for a bit too long (they weren't getting enough light but because of the cold at the time I didn't want to plant them out.)

With advice from italophile - as usual - I buried them deep into their final 25 litre pots, cutting off the lower branches. I did leave a few of the thin papery leaved branches as I didn't want to take off too much growth and they're still there now the plants are outside but they do in parts look like your first photo - the wind has whipped through the leaves and worn them down. 

I'm not worried as all of the new growth coming through is a brilliant green (as opposed to the yelllowy lower branches, and eventually I'll cut those off anyway

KEF
09/06/2013 at 20:10

They look just fine to me, different varieties show differing leaf development, colours and habits, and a bit of scorch here and there isn't life threatening. I've had leaves that look this way and never had blight. Been a tough year up to now for tomatoes. Take heed of italophile, I'd class him / her as a tomato guru. Not saying other members aren't wise, but I thought I know all there was to know about tomato growing until I read I's wise words.

10/06/2013 at 06:42

Not a guru, KEF, I've just grown toms for 20+ years and, particularly in the early days, had the benefit of a lot of advice from some real gurus, particularly a couple of American tom growers who were incredibly generous not only with advice but gifts of very-hard-to-come-by heirloom seeds. Tom growers are a bit of a community - world-wide - and the more help and advice shared around, the better.

The best thing I learned about growing toms was Keep It Simple. Don't fuss over them, don't pamper, don't overwater, don't overfertilise, let them do the work. It's what their genes are programmed to do.

Oh, and I'm a him.

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