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18/06/2013 at 09:06

I have a compost heap at the bottom of my garden which is has started to attract some unwelcome visitors - rats.

I am unsure whether to use a sonic repellent or just lay down some rat traps - does anyone have any experience with either of these prodeucst that have help me to decide what I should use? I really don't want the rats to make it into my house so am very keen to get shot of them!

 

 

18/06/2013 at 09:41

Are you puttung cooked food into the compost heap? This will attract rats!

18/06/2013 at 09:46

Rats are ubiquitous and like to nest in compost heaps as it's warm.   We are in teh country so have them in tehgarden and neiighbouring pasture but when it comes to the bird feeders I draw a line and place poisoned bait in hidden spots because I don't like traps. 

The one I use is Toxa Overdose - sachets of blue stained grains that kill and then dessicate the corpse so there is no smell.  I use it in winter in the attic when the local mice move in for teh winter and it's very effective.   Works on rats too but you need several sachets at a time.  I put them under rhubarb leaves to keep them dry and away from birds.

A good DIY or garden centre will have a variety of products and traps.

18/06/2013 at 10:08

What sort of 'heap' is it? Is there any sort of enclosure (wooden pallets, chicken mesh, plastic 'dalek' type bin)?.

Personally, I use very large, very heavy duty plastic compost 'makers' which I obtained a few years ago from my local council at an incredible discount. The sides open out completely for ease of emptying and turning. They stand on concrete slabs and the bottoms are lined with a double layer of chicken mesh (top layer slightly offset against the bottom layer to reduce the size of the holes) which extends about 6" up the sides of the bins. These measures seem to provide a barrier to things which can burrow under structures or gnaw their way through wooden ones and I would soon see if anything was trying to gnaw at the bin itself.

I never put cooked food or anything meaty or dairy based into the bin (see Sue's comments above) and actually put very limited kitchen waste in. Tea bags, coffee grounds, citrus peel and some other vegetable peelings are ok - but even with these I wait until I have about a foot of garden waste in the bottom.

If you have an unenclosed, dryish compost heap with food in it or near it (eg bird or chicken food) I'm afraid you have a 5 star rat hotel and you will need to take steps. Making the environment as hostile and difficult to infiltrate as possible is much better than then trying to get rid of the rats - they will just keep coming back if they like the accommodation! Prevention is definitely better than cure in this case.

Meantime I'd get a rat man in!

18/06/2013 at 10:28

Jack Russell. works every time. Rats, squirrels, even possums.

18/06/2013 at 10:43

18/06/2013 at 12:32

they are a problem.. live near railway line and always about and ruddy large ones too.

we use bait and air rifle.. take a shot and they dont come back for some time..

if you have composter then bang it every day as they dont like noise and leave it open to get rained on.. as they dont like it very wet either.

if you are on benefits you can get the rat trap man to come in and do it for free or for a fiver i neighbour had them in few years back and they trapped ours too.. said if you take out a colony it will take 3 years for them to build up again.

 

18/06/2013 at 13:22

I saw a rat by the bird feeder a few weeks ago so I put down a live cage trap where we saw it heading (by the dalek compost bins).  I haven't seen it since and the trap wasn't touched till today. It's been set off and all the food has gone but there's no animal inside. I think slugs might have been in there.

BTW, I'm not sure what I would have done with a live rat, but we had the cage trap from when we were trying to get rid of squirrels in the loft.

If it comes back I might try the poison under the rhubarb idea. Do you think this might poison the rhubarb if it got wet though?

18/06/2013 at 13:52

No.  The quantities are far too small.   we're still here anyway and I've been doing this for years now.  When I can see them, I post sachets in the rat tunnels.

18/06/2013 at 15:25

Remember that if you trap rats you have to have a method of killing them.  Bait is better, but do make sure it cannot be reached by anything else.  Putting it under rhubarb leaves is not enough.  

Place rat poison in lengths of down pipe laid on the ground where rats run.  Down the side of a building by a wall is suitable.

18/06/2013 at 18:43

I don't use poison because I can't see a way to poison the rats without poisoning anything else, short of building a rat hotel just to lure them in and poison them. However, as mentioned in the "pigeons are eating my trees" thread, half a gram of lead at 180 metres per second has significant problem-solving capacity, properly applied. Just make sure you put bait somewhere you can see to shoot, then set up and enjoy watching the birdies until you see a rat.

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