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26/03/2013 at 17:45

Due to the snow and cold I havent done much pruning to my roses which are probably far too tall as I didnt prune last autumn either (new to gardening). Is it too late to prune them as they are no longer dormant? Would it do more harm than good?

 

Any advice would be appreciated. Ta. 

26/03/2013 at 17:47

Hi Brycey

If they were mine I'd prune them. 

26/03/2013 at 17:49

Are we talking about climbers here? As I have two Iceberg's that I too didn't prune, totall forgot about them.

26/03/2013 at 18:12

I would defiitely prune. The cold weather means they wont have put on much growth yet and you are unlikely to do any harm

26/03/2013 at 19:05

I would prune as well, just got two climbers left to do, but they are horrid and prickly, so did the others first. Spring is late so they'll think it's normal to prune them now.

26/03/2013 at 19:50

I was going to say the same, due to the cold weather we have been having they probably haven't started to produce much growth yet. You may be able to get there in time.

26/03/2013 at 23:25

I'm waiting till the very cold nights and bitter winds have gone as I've learned from experience that new cuts and heavy frost lead to damaged cells that attract disease or die back.   I have friends with warmer, more sheltered city gardens and they can prune now with confidence but not me yet.

26/03/2013 at 23:38

How actually are you mean't to prune rose climbers? This is my second year having them after purchasing 2 in a sale last year and don't have a clue about pruning.

26/03/2013 at 23:46
Ryan let them grow to height you want before pruning.....you need a framework established first. I would concentrate on feeding this year and forget any pruning
26/03/2013 at 23:48

Climbers flower on new wood so I train my main stems as horizontally aspossible to encourage the sap to flow more easily to make flower buds.   In spring, I cut off all dead and broken shoots and any showing die-back.  I then remove all the small shoots coming up, down or out from the main stems and any weak and spindly stems and then I give the plant a good feed of general purpose food for foliage and rose fertiliser for flowers. 

Each year, on the more established climbers I take at least one main stem out right at the base so the plant puts up new shoots and thus continually renews itself and stays vigorous.  I have some newer climbers which are still too young and small to do this too as yet.

Ramblers flower on wood produced the season before so, other than taking out dead or damaged wood in spring, should be pruned after flowering.

26/03/2013 at 23:53

Thankyou both, they're about 4ft at the moment, but I am currently trying to get them around my arch in the garden. Are there any easy ways of doing this, because the branches just keep flinging out?

27/03/2013 at 08:04
Probably a silly question, but are you tying them to the framework of the arch?
27/03/2013 at 09:58

No, should I be? Was worried that I might slice through the foilage, or break it.

27/03/2013 at 10:44

You ned to tie the main stems to the arch so you can see the structure and stop it all flapping around in strong winds.   Use garden twine, not wires, and tie stems loosely with a figure of 8 looping round the frame and then crossing before looping round the stems.  This allows room for growth and a bit of movement but keeps it all stable.

27/03/2013 at 10:49

Okay thankyou very much obelixx, shall be doing that very soon! How much do you think my roses should grow this year?

27/03/2013 at 18:07

Thanks for the replies fols, apparently we will have another month of cold winter weather! So will maybe wait a couple more weeks then prune. Meant to say the Roses are just plants in the flower bed, not climbers etc

Thanks again

27/03/2013 at 18:32
obelixx wrote (see)

You ned to tie the main stems to the arch so you can see the structure and stop it all flapping around in strong winds.   Use garden twine, not wires, and tie stems loosely with a figure of 8 looping round the frame and then crossing before looping round the stems.  This allows room for growth and a bit of movement but keeps it all stable.

I use this stuff - I think it's called Flexi-tie. It's a stretchy plasic which has some give in it to allow for stem growth. It's a dark brown which 'disappears' visually, and doesn't rot like garden twine. Re-usable too!

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/20628.jpg?width=113&height=150&mode=max

 

27/03/2013 at 22:27

You have to prune them definately in order to control the growing. Roses should not be neglected as they require a lot of care and dedication. You can check out one of my articles, where I explain how to grow roses from scratch. Click here to see it.

29/03/2013 at 11:48

don't pussy foot about roses look beautifull but most are as hardy as a true yorkshireman prune em hard and they will still love you i've done it for the past 30odd years

29/03/2013 at 17:28

Surely pruning roses now is a big mistake,  at least with the frost about they are best left till it get's a lot warmer leastwise when there's no frost about, to me thinking it through logically if you prune now and there's a good hard frost it will kill the new growth,  at least if they are left for a while when the frost's nip it will only be on already dead wood,  I gave mine the prune in October to prevent the winter rock and haven't touched them yet,  the ends are all dead thanks to the frost's but plenty of new growth below which I don't want killed by the frost so come end of April or even earlier I shall prune them

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