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Hi all all my seedlings are damping off what can I do to solve this problem growing them indoors at moment

Jim Macd

You have to be very clean. Only use new compost, clean pots and if you can't get good air flow use Bordeaux Mixture. If you see any affect plants clean them away ASAP avoiding spreading any spores. If you buy basil from the supermarket check it over thoroughly before letting it loose in your kitchen.

Fleurisa

Sow your seeds more sparsely, remove covers as soon as the seedlings come up. Only use tap water

Malcolm Harrison

Hi Marie - What are the conditions under which you are growing the seedlings? If the temperature is too high water loss from the young leaves is more than can be provided from the roots via the stem and the leaves lose their turgidity ie they droop. I would put them in a cooler place uncovered and place the pots in a shallow tray of about 1 cm of water.

Hope this helps.

artjak

The advice above; remove covers the moment seedling appear

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cairnsie

Make sure you soak old pots and propagators for a while in water and bleach.

artjak

Oh yes, I'm a bit obsessed about hygene in the greenhouse. I've only had a g/h for a short while; every book I read about them emphasised hygene; I thought, 'good grief; it's like having a baby!'

So all pots and seed trays get scrubbed with hot water, with disinfectant, really well, air dried and then kept in the g/h in large lidded plastic boxes until needed again. Tedious, but necessary.

nutcutlet

Well, I don't know what to say.

Here I am germinating hardy perennials one after another. Never washed a pot, not fussy about where the water comes from, no hygeine at all.

Never had a problem

But there's no heat, perhaps that makes a difference. and plenty of air circulation

 

Jim Macd
nutcutlet wrote (see)

Well, I don't know what to say.

Here I am germinating hardy perennials one after another. Never washed a pot, not fussy about where the water comes from, no hygeine at all.

Never had a problem

But there's no heat, perhaps that makes a difference. and plenty of air circulation

 

I don't think you're growing tender exotics in a stuffy kitchen though are you nut? I don't bother washing pots  most of the time either and I don't have a problem with botrytis either on the whole. I do see it on basil I buy from the supermarket during the winter but if you clean it up ASAP and open up the plant it's us usually the last you see of it. But the OP obviously has a problem with it, but if what you're grown needs heat and protection, all the conditions for botrytis then what are you going to do?

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