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6 messages
11/04/2014 at 11:08

Many gardeners that grow veg in pots and containers do so because they have small gardens, so what do you do with all the spent compost? There's so much of it for a small garden and you can't put it in the council green bin.

11/04/2014 at 12:12

How small is the garden?

I can't ever get enough compost.   Could you just add it to one massive planter?

I remember hearing once that most plant nutrients come from the air.  So I'd have thought that even spent compost would have it's purpose.  If not just for water retention.

11/04/2014 at 12:18

Hi, what I do is take about a foot away out of the pots, fork in some Fish, Blood and Bone. Now is the opportunity to put some Hort Grit in to if drainage needs improving. Then replace with fresh multi-purpose compost. That way you are not throwing so much away and you are not using to much fresh multi-purpose compost. Hope that helps.

11/04/2014 at 13:07

Spread it under any shrubs that you have as mulch.

11/04/2014 at 17:52

Use it as a mulch on your garden.    Put it into your compost bin - it will be full of bacteria which will help speed up the composting process.     Never give it to the Council!    

11/04/2014 at 20:02

I too have this problem. I live in a ground floor council flat and everything I grow has to be in containers. It's quite a large balcony ( 6m long by 1.1m deep) I have to put it in black bags every year and chuck it in the communal palladin bins. It always seems like such a waste of money. I seem to remember reading that its best to replace all the compost rather than just adding fish blood and bone or slow release fertiliser to the soil as they never have the same nutrient balance as natural compost. I've decided to try it in a large 75 ltr container and see what happens. I'll be growing Ivy up some trellis from it and probably some sort of annual at the front.

I suppose it also depends on what plants you intend on growing too.

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