14 messages
18/02/2013 at 21:10

Hi Gardeners Can someone tell me which vegetable don't like being planted in beds which have recently had horse manure added   

18/02/2013 at 21:20
I think that roots like carrots aren't that keen.
18/02/2013 at 21:23
Good question Tractorboy - I'd love to know the answer too. Also, is it ok to put manure in greenhouse beds?
18/02/2013 at 21:27

Don't grow potatoes in freshly manured soil.

Is the manure well-rotted or fresh?  If fresh it would be best to heap it up and let it rot down before applying it to the soil, otherwise it might be too fierce.

18/02/2013 at 21:30

I add a bit of horse manure to the compost bins.

18/02/2013 at 22:05

Best not to sow carrots in freshly manured soil.  They often grow in a "fork" shape then, so although their weight/volume might be OK, the useable part (after any peeling etc) will be less than it would otherwise be.

As far as horse-muck's concerned - as with any manure - it needs to be well rotted before you use it.  These days more and more people are using wood shavings as bedding for horses (rather than straw) and this means it takes rather longer to rot down than the conventional straw bedding.  I've used wood-shavings bedding from family ponies' stabling in the past - left it in closed plastic bags for 12 months though!

18/02/2013 at 22:27

Hi BE VERY CAREFULL where you get your horse manure from some years ago whole allotments where destroyed by a weed killer used to kill weeds in meadow grasses the weedkiller was called Forfront;

Derek

19/02/2013 at 09:17

clogerhead is right, if you live near a stables you can find out about the fields where the horses have fed to avoid this problem.

19/02/2013 at 10:24

I'm lucky enough to have horses. I leave the manure to rot for a year and put it all over the veg garden in the autumn. But I don't grow carrots. I had heavy clay, but years later, it's almost loam. Only problem is horses live out with field shelters where they eat hay. Manure from mucked out shelters full of weed seeds from hay and grazing that survive being digested and left to rot!

19/02/2013 at 10:26

Forgot to say, I put well rotted manure in the tomato bed in the greenhouse.

23/02/2013 at 14:42

Hi tractorboy the best rule of thumb is allways make sure your manure is well rotted, then you can put a top layer in your greenhouse every other year tomatoes love it.never grow root crops(carrots-parsnips) in freshly manured ground,all other crops are ideal. When digging manure in make sure it is buried for maximum benifit. 

23/02/2013 at 14:46

with horse manure you must let it stand for 6months before using not only because of the burn damage to crops but also parasites or viruses that are in the manure.the heat of composting will hopefully destroy them.

25/09/2013 at 20:41

Thanks everyone that was a great help , cheers

25/09/2013 at 22:19

It's debatable when to spread manure on your veg beds but everyone seems to agree it needs to be well rotted down, I spread in Autumn with muck I've had rotting down for 12 months, some veg growers wait till spring.

I've three veg beds and try to operate a crop rotation system, you should not grow a vegetable in the same spot each year. I grow roots, brassicas and other veg in the seperate beds.

So in answer to the Q, on a crop rotation system...manure enrich's the soil... roots and brassicas don't like enriched soil, so stuff like beetroot, carrot's, parsnip's and spuds for roots... and broccoli, brussels, cabbage, swede and turnip for brassica's...there are more root and brassica vegs...won't grow well in soil freshly manured.

Stuff like beans, celeriac, beet, onions and leeks, peas, spinach and sweet corn,   grow well, in ground manured in the Autumn and can be planted in your other bed...

Hope this is helpful, happy growing... 

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