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5 messages
24/04/2012 at 17:46

I am after some advice. My garden was re-turfed just over a year ago (before we boght the house) and the ground is permanently very damp. Someone suggested planting a couple of 'trees' of varieties which will help to take up a lot of moisture. The garden is approximately 5x5m. I would prefer to not have to dig up the turf and start over as I am partially disabled. Any suggestions greatfully received.

24/04/2012 at 17:53

Hi glad you made it over from the other board.

Are you on a flood plain? Is it still damp in the summer?

24/04/2012 at 17:56

Not a good idea. Thirsty evergreens like leylandii will cast a lot of shade which will not do your lawn any good at all, and deciduous trees will not draw up any moisture when you most need it in winter, and will result in a lot of moss, followed by bald patches in summer. 

You could try aeration with a tine fork, but I'm afraid you have already hit on the real solution, which is to dig it up, find out what the problem is, prepare the soil properly, and returf.   

24/04/2012 at 17:57
fazzini wrote (see)

I am after some advice. My garden was re-turfed just over a year ago (before we boght the house) and the ground is permanently very damp. Someone suggested planting a couple of 'trees' of varieties which will help to take up a lot of moisture. The garden is approximately 5x5m. I would prefer to not have to dig up the turf and start over as I am partially disabled. Any suggestions greatfully received.

Permanently very damp does not sound good and you may have a drainage problem.

I would dig a experimental hole first-or get someone to do it for you- to see if the water drains way before spending money on trees.

25/04/2012 at 19:01

Thanks for the advice.  I feared I may need to get the ground prepared.  I'm not on a flood plain, but yes it can be quite damp in the summer too.  The garden does face north east so gets some sun in the morning and before noon (when we have some!)The recent warm, dry weather firmed and dried the very top layer - even to the point it appeared cracked, but go just a few millimetres down and the ground was still damp.  I think I will need to get someone to come and check it out for me as the current rain has turned it into a muddy 'filed' again.  Many thanks again.

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