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9 messages
17/10/2013 at 11:35

Hi, we moved into our new home 5 months ago, there s a massive Weeping Willow tree in the garden, which initially I loved, but it does nothing but shed leaves constantly, now there is fungi ( mushrooms) growing on the roots, tried finding out whether this is a huge problem or not? There must be well over a hundred mushrooms, anyone tell me if this tree is safe? And should we remove the mushrooms or will they die off ? Thank you. 

17/10/2013 at 11:46

Hi Debbie. removing fungi fruiting bodies doesn't affect anything at all. Check out all the honey fungus threads on the forum and see if they match what you've got

17/10/2013 at 13:32

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/32578.jpg?width=360&height=350&mode=max

 

17/10/2013 at 13:32

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/32575.jpg?width=273&height=350&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/32576.jpg?width=273&height=350&mode=max

 honey fungus round the tree and across the lawn over the roots.

It's emerging from the trunk as well but the pics weren't very good

17/10/2013 at 13:35

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/32579.jpg?width=360&height=350&mode=max

 

17/10/2013 at 13:38

They look the same type of fungi.  My concern is for the tree, a couple of branches fell off a few weeks ago, they were rotted. Is the tree  going to be at risk of rotting which could mean it toppling over and doing damage to our house or our neighbours?

17/10/2013 at 13:58

After reading various websites on Willow trees, it looks  like we have a problem with blight too, the leaves and branches on  our tree are showing the same problem as featured on another web page. think its time to phone a tree surgeon!

17/10/2013 at 14:14

If the branches are dropping and they are rotten inside then it's likely that the tree is rotten throughout.  In my opinion it needs to come down before the autumn gales 

There are varieties of trees which are resistant to honey fungus, so when the willow is gone perhaps you can find something you like to replace it 

17/10/2013 at 21:08

Agree 100% with Dove.  I had a 70 foot tall rotting Ash tree blown down several years ago.  It totally destroyed 2 greenhouses and 5 or 6 fence panels, wrecked the conservatory and took a few tiles off of the roof.  The appearance of Honey fungus and a branch dropping in Autumn were the only signs of an otherwise healthy looking tree.  It turned out that the entire centre of the trunk was rotten, leaving just a few inches of solid wood beneath the bark.

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