Start a new thread

1 to 9 of 9 replies

Does anyone grow alliums from seed? I have some fab allium heads from this years flowers that are packed with seed.  Could I grow new plants from these seeds ?  

Also how long will I have to wait for a flower on my Agapanthus I have grown from seed? Alot of green but no flower stalk .....must be 4 years old now !!!

Berghill

Posted this before, but cannot find it.

Sow the seed fresh. It germinates better straight from the plant rather than being dried off.

Cover lightly with grit, gravel or whatever rather than compost.

Sow in a deep pot rather than a seed tray (reasons later).

Leave exposed to weather. They need a period of cold followed by warmth to initiate germination.

When (if?) they germinate do not be in a hurry to p rick them out. This is the reason for deep pot rather than seed tray. They have only one root to begin with and if it is damaged, it dies and a new one has to be produced from the base of the seedling. usually they die.

Feed the seed pot with dilute Baby Bio type stuff, until the leaves go yellow then allow the pot to dry off.

Repotting may be done when they are dormant. Some types never really go dormant so be careful.

I often do not repot until they have had another seasons growth. Remember many of them actually grow in late winter/early spring.

Cannot think of anything else for the moment.

Not as hard as it seems.

The bigger the bulb the longer it takes to reach flowering size.

Agapanthus can take up to 7 years.

Thank you very much for such detailed info Berghill it's really appreciated. I am amazed at how long they take to reach flowering size. 

What puzzles me is that people say if you leave the spent flowers in place they seed all over and you can end up with loads of alliums? How can that be if it takes seven years to flower-by that time, in my garden anyway, I will have raked the ground, probably replanted or moved other plants etc so how can they survive all the disturbance?? 

nutcutlet

7 years passes in no time Passionate and not everthing takes that long. Alliums are generally quicker than agapanthus. I reckon 3, maybe 4, for Allium christophii. Some of the smaller ones in 2 years. You can end up with what looks like a new lawn and is hundreds of allium seedlings

Hi Nutcutlet, thanks for that I surpose you are right seven years isn't long, but my puzzle is by that time I will have moved plants and disturbed the area many times over so will have dug up seeds and seedlings without realising they were alliums

so how can alliums seeds naturalise unless you leave the area undisturbed, or is this what you have to do? 

Advertisement

nutcutlet

There are so many seeds, like aquilegias, once they seed. they're off on a takeover bid and you have to weed out the excess rather that preserve some

 

Nutcutlet,   Oh I see, thanks for that I'll be interested to see how things develop.

 

Berghill

And it is only the really big, tall Alliums which take so long to reach flowering size, most of the smaller ones can flower in 2 years. I have just planted out a large number of Allium wallichii which are 2 years old and have incipient flower stalks in them. They may flower, if the weather is not too unkind.

Thank you very much for such detailed info Berghill it's really appreciated. I am amazed at how long they take to reach flowering size. 

What puzzles me is that people say if you leave the spent flowers in place they seed all over and you can end up with loads of alliums? How can that be if it takes seven years to flower-by that time, in my garden anyway, I will have raked the ground, probably replanted or moved other plants etc so how can they survive all the disturbance?? 

Sign up or log in to post a reply