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I have some golden green bamboo in a couple of troughs on wheels that I use as temporary wind and view breaks.

 

This winter under our car port they have got some sooty mould , no doubt because it was mild and wet, which is unsightly.

Should I prune some or all of it back? Its been in for a couple of years now and is about 4ft tall on average.

Atilla

Bamboo should like wet and mild, mine put on new growth in winter, sending out shoots. They do naturally lose leaves now. I am wondering if air circulation is too poor in your car port, causing mould? So I would leave the leaves and stalks and let the wind and nature take its course.

Pruning wise, I only thin out stalks but some people do cut Bamboo when they have reached their desired height - it is up to you if you think 4ft is the right height. Those pruned stalks do not grow taller, only new ones will.

Thanks, I've wheeled the troughs out where the wind will blow through them and see what happens.

Just found this old post.. well the bamboo did improve, but never really seemed happy, so I have been bold and planted it out in my hot and gravelly front garden. Not ideal conditions but maybe it will thwart it from running wild.

 

Memo to Alan Titchmarsh.

 

What on earth  were you doing allowing your team to plant a yew hedge in the garden where three little girls will play !

I hope the parents, who happen to work in a garden centre are better clued up. All parts of yew are poisonous - shame on you and the TV company, I would also like to say that I think the amounts of money spent on these projects is obscene

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Georgiesunflowe, 

not  a semsible thing to do. 

Would not plant it in the garden.....have you not read here about bamboo?

Dovefromabove

Potato leaves, rhubarb leaves and many other common garden plants are also poisonous - children who cannot be relied on not to put everything into their mouths should not be in a garden unsupervised.

There is no need for irrational hysteria.

NB Alan Titchmarsh's current series is nothing to do with Gardeners' World.

.........now......you....tell....me....................

That will be why they plant Yews in cemetaries then ............not too much risk to the occupants. 

If you are unable to treat nature sensibly, you should never leave the safety of your bed. 

..but what about bed mites?  They can eat you to death......

............the environment natural or otherwise is full of dangers.  Giant hogweed is currently making the headlines

education.....black currants, black berries on privet?  How do kids know which is safe?  By being told when they are young.

Dovefromabove
philippa smith2 wrote (see)

That will be why they plant Yews in cemetaries then ............not too much risk to the occupants. 

If you are unable to treat nature sensibly, you should never leave the safety of your bed. 

One theory is that cemeteries/churchyards would never be grazed, so the villagers' animals would be safe, and the yews needed for the manufacture of long-bows, could be grown.

Bed mites............hmm........I just KNEW there was something wrong with my theory

No....wait a minute........you could eat them.......full of protein I expect.......then you would really never have to leave your bed

As you and Dove say, it is education which is the key.  It really is quite frightening to read/see/hear how unaware people are of life these days

Dovefromabove
georgiesunflowe wrote (see)

Memo to Alan Titchmarsh.

 

What on earth  were you doing allowing your team to plant a yew hedge in the garden where three little girls will play !

I hope the parents, who happen to work in a garden centre are.............

........ rational human beings who know about plants and will educate their daughters in a sensible way.

Dove........yes.............I remember getting a very interesting and informative answer to the Yews in  Cemetaries from someone on this forum a couple of years ago.

This was just my poor attempt at sarcasm  (still holds true tho ).

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Yes there are plenty of poisonous things in our gardens, but shiny red berries are much more likely to be tempting to nibble than a rhubarb leaf! Other than monkshood I think yew is one of the most toxic. The three little girls were very young and close together and parents are not always listened to are they? I just feel it was so irresponsible of the programme makers to have permitted this  blunder when there are so many other things that could have been used.

 

Dovefromabove

I grew up in the countryside around all sorts of poisonous plants - so did my brother who was (and is) close in age to me.  We didn't even have a garden fence to keep us out of the woods and fields; we played in the churchyards, fields, ditches, woods and commons from a very young age. 

Human brain development goes through various stages - one of the stages when children are young is one where recognition of dangerous foodstuffs is imprinted (as it would have been with small children when we were evolving living in caves with no fences around gardens).  That's the reason why so many children with severe autism are excessively finnicky eaters (to put it mildly) - because that bit of brain development has become rigid. 

If very young children are taught by their parents what is safe to eat and what is not, they will remember.  I knew from a very young age that 'shiny red berries' were nasty and would make me ill - I was never tempted by them and neither were any of my friends.  If you leave it too late to teach this information it's much harder for the brain to absorb the information and retain it's importance. 

Of course, if someone has a moderate to severe learning disability the ability of their brain to take in this information and of course these children should be protected from harmful plants.

cathy43

Its not just education of whats poisonous, I have a neighbour who moans at me because there are roses growing against my fence and her children might prick their fingers ( i would like to say to stop the children trying to get into my garden, but they find mine exciting). However how are they going to learn thorns are going to prick, proportionally it is not going to do much harm but they are being taught roses are dangerous

Dovefromabove

Cathy

I'm constantly amazed that the human race has survived this long whether it will survive much longer remains to be seen

Supernoodle
I actually think minor injuries are good - so that children realise we are right when we say not to touch \eat etc. And then hopefully obey regarding the really dangerous stuff.