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23/01/2014 at 21:55

Hi - I need to know if bamboo is nature friendly in the UK - having no pandas

around here I'm not sure if it's really ethical to plant bamboo?!!

 

23/01/2014 at 22:37

I would never grow bamboo flowersforbees.  Ok there are some supposedly non invasive types but all are a big NO for me.  

How about growing miscanthus as a screen?  

23/01/2014 at 22:49

Thanks Verdun I will look into miscanthus.  I was a bit worried about the

bamboo being invasive, it was just a neighbour suggested it might be useful.

I don't want an actual hedge, but just a screen. 

23/01/2014 at 22:51

There are some Pandas around  

23/01/2014 at 23:05

Hey,  like that. PANDA 

23/01/2014 at 23:26
I have some bamboo's growing in big pots but they do tend to be a bit droopy and hang forward rather than screening...as i really wanted. Don't trust them not to spread even if they say clump forming...mine are and still try to escape their pots.
24/01/2014 at 09:22

Are you definitely looking for a grassy screen ffb?  I'd go along with the 'not bamboo' lobby.

You can  get some from the Chinese supermarket if 4thPanda comes to lunch

How high do you want the screening?

24/01/2014 at 11:42

I have a clump forming bamboo, which I have placed as a screen and its very effective.

I use nasturtium seeds and clematis to grow through them in summer for pollinators, and give extra colour.

You can get bamboo which you can use as a screen. Containing the roots is fairly simple by buying a bamboo control system. It's easy to fit, but if you are going for bamboo, fit the control system before planting, it's easier than doing it after.

Bamboo is shallow rooted so the control system does keep them in check.

I know some don't like them, but there are a good number of useful bugs among the root systems and good leaf cover for overwintering insects.

Just pick the right type of bamboo. 

 http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.Bamboo-control-system/sort.0/

 

24/01/2014 at 12:52

Fargesia bamboo do not run and you do not need bamboo rhizome barriers for them, so no need to buy that. I have aseveral different types of bamboo and Fargesia are very compact, have created a screen quickly and going by the Frogs, Toads and insects that I have found around mine, nature has adapted to them. They quickly form a mulch around themselves as well.

http://scottishbamboo.com/search.htm?search=fargesia&action2=GO

Do not bother with them in pots as you will not be able to water them enough and every time you have high winds they will fall over.

24/01/2014 at 13:01

Flowersfor bees

Difference of opinion here so look into this very carefully.  Look at the pros and cons and then make up your own mind.

One other consideration.    The cost.  Fargesias are expensive.  

24/01/2014 at 17:22
Its strange how individual experiences vary. I have never had a problem with watering or them blowing over in pots...perhaps because i use large heavy pots, i don't know. I have certainly found the clump forming bamboo to eventually fill the pots completely and even crack one around a couple of feet wide, which may well be just natural spreading, though i would agree that Fargesia is not as vigorous as some i have tried.
One advantage i have found from growing in pots, is they can be moved to a sheltered place in winter. They are surprisingly hardy in most cases, however, i have found they do tend to go brown on the leaf tips if left in a windy situation.
24/01/2014 at 18:46

I'm inclined to go with Dave Morgan and Blairs.............it seems a shame to dismiss "Bamboos" out of hand but you do need to know what you are planting for your particular plot.

The right bamboo in the right situation is beautiful.  

Just out of interest, are there any other plants you guys thought were brilliant but then turned out to be a nightmare ?

24/01/2014 at 19:00
Oh no, don't dismiss bamboo...i like my bamboos.

Rhubarb...i love it in crumble but when i tried to move it in the garden it just would not stop popping up in its old position. Suppose i shouldn't complain...more puddings...lol.
24/01/2014 at 19:40

For an unusual screen then I do recommend Loquat. It grows thick and is evergreen. You may even get fruits on it that wildlife love.

Only nightmare plants for me are Mint and fruits (blackcurrant and raspberry). Mint really does sprout like mad from seemingly nothing. This mild weather has not helped - I found loads of it in a 'cleared bed'.

24/01/2014 at 21:11

Philippa, yes.  Euphorbia griffithi, a lovely variety with beautiful red tinged foliage, became a nightmare popping up everywhere.  Artemisia limelight is even worse. 

Invasive plants are now banned here and new ones are always checked for such temdencies

Also a relative nightmare ..........pampas grass.  Thug like,sharp edged and over rated and under controlled generally.

24/01/2014 at 21:12

Thanks so much everyone for all your help and suggestions, it has really given

me lots of food for thought.  I liked your message 4thPanda!!  Think I'll do a bit

more research before I decide.  In answer to your question Nutcutlet, I wouldn't

want anything much more than 10ft. high but nothing less than 8ft high as it's

to screen off an ugly wall.  Will let you know what I decide........eventually!

24/01/2014 at 21:14

Philippa, yes.  Euphorbia griffithi, a lovely variety with beautiful red tinged foliage, became a nightmare popping up everywhere.  Artemisia limelight is even worse. 

Invasive plants are now banned here and new ones are always checked for such temdencies

Also a relative nightmare ..........pampas grass.  Thug like,sharp edged and over rated and under controlled generally.

Another relative nightmare .....my cousin. 

24/01/2014 at 21:26

Verdun - I made the mistake of planting a tiny little pampas grass twenty  oddyears

ago and now it's a monster, but I haven't the heart to uproot it as it's where my

hedgehogs hibernate!  I definitely wouldn't recommend it though - as soon as

the lovely cream fronds appear, the wind gets going and blows them all to

smithereens, so there's not much point in it really. It's O.K. on large estates

along with the ornamental rhubarb I suppose?! 

24/01/2014 at 21:52

Pampas grass is oddly invasive. I found lots of it growing in gravel at my in laws house in Inverness in quite heavy shade. I wondered what the strange leaves were, Cordyline looking but rough like reed. I do think that it could be fitted into more modern plantings but it does look dated in a 1970 raised island in suburbia.

24/01/2014 at 21:57

Not wishing to upset anyone.  As with so many plants, trees and shrubs.  The final descion is down to the gardener.  On the subject of Bamboo.  It is quite a large family.  Some are more invasive than others.  Take time in your selection.  Once planted, try and not let too much old growth remain.  Try and encourage new fresh growth, that way you will limit the spread.  Should you desire bamboo to form a hedge.  Plant it well forward of any fence, wall etc.  This will give you room to get behind it and control it.

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