Start a new thread

1 to 20 of 38 replies

flumpy1
Whats your review on Beechgrove??, as a beginner i love it, as it shows you how to do everything from scratch and good advice too
Forester2

I agree - smashing programme and so genteel. 

flumpy1
Yes it is, i love scotland i have a lot of family in scotland and seen lots of lovely gardens there
chicky

Big fan of Beechgrove here too - it is so nice to have 2 gardening programmes a week to look forward to

Scott Edwards

Whilst I enjoy watching both Gardener's World and Beechgrove, if I was only able to watch one of them it would (at the moment) be Beechgrove. I personally believe it gives clearer more practical advice for a beginner. Really impressed with Chris Bradshaw's slot with a couple of families with new gardens.   

Advertisement

LorraineP

I'm a fan of Beechgrove too - and its not ousted for the boring snooker either!  

Scott Edwards

The snooker goes on for so many days that I'm bored silly by the time the semi's arrive and I'm a snooker fan! Love gardening more though!

Love Beechgrove, I think the advice is clear concise, catering for all from Novice to expert. Don't cancel it!

 

I'm a fan of Beechgrove too. It gives clear concise practical advice on what to do in your garden. The section on the new gardens is very inspiring and just goes to show what can be done in an average sized garden. 

flumpy1

I agree with you chicks, there's so many cooking programmes on it drives you crazy, it's so nice to have two gardening programmes on (a breath of fresh air) hope you've all had a lovely bank holiday 

Busy Bee2

What is good about Beechgrove is that although they are often doing basic stuff, they are always asking 'why do I do it this way?' and experimenting with different ways of doing things - like whether or not to use crocks at the bottom of a plant pot.  Without that experimenting, questioning thing, more advanced gardeners might find the programme to be a bit 'plodding', but since gardeners are all scientists in their own little way, testing, and querying, and comparing makes even the simplest task interesting.  However, after a point made by someone on another thread last week, I did notice that the Beechgrove garden itself does look more like a smallholding than a cohesive and attractive whole.  But then again, after visiting a 'proper' garden today, we did take some interest in the fact that there was a whole 'private' area of greenhouses and polytunnels and sheds.  Shame, as I would have enjoyed poking about in those!!

Obelixx

The Beechgrove garden is like Geoff H's was when he was at the helm of GW - lots of different plots designed in different ways but mostly about the size of an average urban plot so he could feature different plants and designs in both context and scale to which ordinary gardeners can relate.  

I like all the experimenting with plants an dplanting conditions and tecniques and composts, open ground, raised beds, plytunnles and greenhouses.  They have relevance for  a wide range of gardeners, gardens and micro climates.

They pack in a great deal of info on a wide range of topics yet never seem hirried or superficial and the addition of Chris beardshaw to the team is inspired whetehr he's at Beechrove or helping new build gardeners.

 

 

.

ighten

Like the format..Simple advice well presented. Its like an RHS encyclopedia. Informative but just a little cold and characterless.

Dont like some  (other than CB) of the cringeworthy  (could be a little harsh but the sauvignon was excellent tonight) presenters , and really dislike the venue -  These (or all garden) programs work for me when we see a garden developing (which at the moment is where GW is letting itself down a little by not showing enough of longmeadow as it develops through the year.

One problem I find with Beechgrove is it feels and looks less like  a real garden and  more like  a trip around different parts of an urban council park..

In the end I find it utterly flawed and a little dull. I want to see how things work in "x persons " garden as a complete entity and how the whole thing comes together.. not a silly competition about whose sweet peas look best depending on how they are grown and raised or whose managed to grow the biggest pumpkin..

I better get my coat

 

pansyface

I find that the Aberdonian climate reflects the one I have to put up with. Wind, rain, you know... When GW starts on about "oh, all this hot dry weather..." I usually laugh and throw another log on the fire.

i'm a fan too,look forward to a peaceful half hour and learn lots while little ones asleep

Advertisement

jatnikapyar

ighten, "....I'll get my coat " I'll get mine too

I have just got round to watching last Sunday's episode of Beechgrove, which I love.  I have a REAL soft spot for Jim, for his love of his job as well as his no-nonsense manner.  No highfalutin rubbish with Jim!

I like the contributions the various presenters make and even tolerate CB's excruciatingly tedious attempts to over-complicate every single matter and turn it into an opportunity for some would-be science or "Latin" lecture

I'm not insensible of his abilities as a gardener and designer, of course, but I do wish he would stop trying to impress us with his supposed erudition.

In this particular episode, a viewer asked about enjoyable plant names and CB jumped at the chance to display his... Latin.  He chose “cercidiphyllum japonicum” and then proceeded to translate, for the enhancement of the audience’s  linguistic skills,  the "Latin", confusing the Greek "cerci" for the Latin "circum", and being totally unaware that not a single part of this compound noun is Latin.  That only challenged Carole, who ended up using another "Latin" word, "brachyglottis", which is not Latin either, making Jim, this most experienced of gardeners, feel he had to tell his audience, almost apologetically, that he too had done Latin at school for a while, as if the other two had university degrees in the subject!

By all means, the likes of CB can enlighten us in every relevant way but they should, perhaps, stop making themselves look ridiculous by claiming to have knowledge in areas which they so blatantly lack AND making colleagues feel somehow inferior; especially not the ones I like most!  

Obelixx

It's just a simple case of people thinking all botanical names have Latin origins.  Many have Greek origins to their name - clematis for example - so they really should use the word Botanical instead.

CB was a lecturer at Pershore so probably can't help himself and I usually learn from his explanations and his eye for detail but yes, he can be a bit earnest sometimes.

Phaidra says:

 

I like the contributions the various presenters make and even tolerate CB's excruciatingly tedious attempts to over-complicate every single matter and turn it into an opportunity for some would-be science or "Latin" lecture. ...

In this particular episode, a viewer asked about enjoyable plant names and CB jumped at the chance to display his... Latin.  He chose “cercidiphyllum japonicum” and then proceeded to translate, for the enhancement of the audience’s  linguistic skills,  the "Latin", confusing the Greek "cerci" for the Latin "circum", and being totally unaware that not a single part of this compound noun is Latin. ...

See original post

 Hi Phaidra

I too find his propensity to lecture quite irritating, but, as Obelixx says, he once did it for a living and, obviously, hasn't adjusted yet.  Hopefully, he'll stop this rather infernal habit someday soon, for I sense that Jim, who, I think, can't stand tripe, might ask him to put a sock in it!

As  for the display of erudition relating to Cercidiphyllum Japonicum, I felt a bit embarrassed for him when I realised he was imagining  the word κερκις was Latin and meaning "round".

However exasperating he can be at times, he won't put me off watching Beechgrove as I thoroughly enjoy it.  AND, he's not always there (!); though, I do admit, his contributions can be very good when he doesn't try to show off too much.

obelixx says:

It's just a simple case of people thinking all botanical names have Latin origins...

CB was a lecturer at Pershore so probably can't help himself and I usually learn from his explanations and his eye for detail but yes, he can be a bit earnest sometimes.

See original post
Yes, ignorance plain and simple. 
Calling CB "earnest" is rather charitable of you.  I find his carry-ons at times excruciatingly tedious and when he makes Jim feel uncomfortable, my hackles rise!

 

Last edited: 22 July 2016 23:13:30