Start a new thread

1 to 20 of 23 replies

daydaisy

After watching Tony Buckland on the Great British Garden Revival programme I was inspired to make a herb pot. I duly retrieved a large ceramic pot from a corner of my garden and found lots of slugs and snails hibernating in the sludgy base of the pot. There were also masses of tiny creamy white thread worms. I did not what to dispose the sludge on my garden as I didn't know what they were. Does anyone have any ideas as to what they might be? 

nutcutlet

are they in water or soil daydaisy and have you a photo?

daydaisy

unfortunately I didn't take a photo of them and just disposed of them along with the snails and slugs on the field opposite my house, they were in the sludgy damp soil that had accumulated at the bottom of the pot and also around the drier sides. There were two huge wood lice there also and I wondered if they had anything to do with them?

nutcutlet

I would need to see them. I'm no expert. I can tell worm from insect larva but that's about as far as it goes

Not the woodlice, they don't have a stage like that.

Dovefromabove

Googling suggests that they might be fungus gnat larvae - google for images of them and see what you think. 

Advertisement

nutcutlet

I was imagining them to be a bit bigger than that, (threadworm size)

Daisy, they may be parasitic worms which occur naturally in the soil. google white thread worms in soil and have a look at images this may give you the answer.

nutcutlet

What are they parasitic on Dave?

daydaisy

I have googled extensively and really cannot positively identify these tiny worms. The nearest possibility seems to be wire worms which are the larva of the click beetle, though why they should end up in my terracotta plant pot I don't know. Anyway I'm glad I didn't put them on the garden just in case!

Nut they can be parasitic in humans and animals, so its best to be careful handling them. There are quite a few types, and as usual they prefer certain victims!

Lion S

Might be potworms, daydaisy. Just a thought.

nutcutlet

Dave, thread worms don't live in soil. The adult worm stage is in our gut, they come down and lay eggs  at our backsides. These eggs are relayed back to our mouth on unwashed hands, via food or directly, and hatch again in the gut.

 

 

 

daydaisy

Wonderboy Click beetles are not friends! Wire worms ruin your carrot crop and other root vegetables. I do agree that some beetles are much friendlier.

Advertisement

Atilla

I would clean the pot with hot soapy water mixed with a dollop of bleach to keep things clean for your herbs. What are you thinking?

nutcutlet wrote (see)

Dave, thread worms don't live in soil. The adult worm stage is in our gut, they come down and lay eggs  at our backsides. These eggs are relayed back to our mouth on unwashed hands, via food or directly, and hatch again in the gut.

Nut, that was my immediate reaction as well, However, after a while with Google, I wasn't so sure...

More research needed, I think; a lot of sources (medical and other) do say that threadworms can live in soil. Still seems a bit unlikely, with modern sanitation etc. How would they get there? I'm assuming that human threadworms are species-specific.

 

 

 

 

nutcutlet

I think all intestinal parasites are species-specific.

I think the confusion is in the use of common names.

I have heard strongyloides referred to as thread worms.  

Our threadworms are common and  harmless infestations of (mostly) children.

daydaisy

Busy Lizzie II think you have solved my conundrum! the worms shown look just like mine. Perhaps I should have fed them to my fish in my pond. thank you!