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6 messages
08/09/2013 at 16:16

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/30707.jpg?width=272&height=350&mode=max

 This Dragon tree is about 2ft tall and as you can see it appears to be dieing from the top ie the dead leaves. I have been told you can cut a dragon tree back down its main stem and it will regrow is this true?

08/09/2013 at 16:29

Yes, that's true Ogster, they can be cut back.  Also the stem that you cut off can be cut into sections and planted (right way up), you'll get baby dracaenas.

09/09/2013 at 10:11

How much of the cut of stems should i re-plant ?

09/09/2013 at 12:00

ogster, I successfully used 6-8 inch lengths, buried about 1/3rd into a 50/50 mix of sharp sand and multi-purpose potting compost.  To make sure you plant things the right way up, the general method is to cut the bottom straight across and then trim the top at an angle.  If you always do that, things can never get mixed-up.  I was also advised to leave the cuttings for a few hours before planting so that the cuts calloused over - I'm not sure whether that is strictly necessary but it worked for me.

Edit:, I just checked and this very site has advice:

http://www.gardenersworld.com/how-to/projects/basics/how-to-take-stem-cuttings-from-dracaena/162.html

Different from mine, so you might want to try both ways - looks as though you have plenty of source material to experiment with!

10/09/2013 at 00:08

Ogster, when you have grown your baby dracaenas, you can shorten the stems, and often will then get two or three heads in the place of the one that you removed. You will see little bumps on the stem. These are potential new growth, so cut to just above one.

And NEVER overwater.  The die very quickly if too wet. Always let them dry out to at least a couple of inches below the soil surface before watering thoroughly, then remove any water from the saucer after a few minutes.I used to be an itnterior gardener, and we only watered some of our dracaenas every 6 wks or more.  Always feel your soil before watering.  Most plants will recover from quite severe underwatering, but will die if constantly wet, so go easy on the water.

10/09/2013 at 09:41

Hi, I took cuttings with my primary school gardening club and had 100% success. We cut the stems into10cm lengths putting the 'bottoms' of the stems in a cup of water and waited for the roots to appear (which they did) We then potted up in compost mixed with some sand and the stems began to develop bumps then leaves. The original plants  sprouted bumps and new leaves too and all our babies grew well and we sold them at a school fair.

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