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04/08/2013 at 14:26
http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/28754.jpg?width=270&height=350&mode=max

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

04/08/2013 at 17:57

Hi ffb, front right just under a large divided leaf I can see achillea (yarrow) just coming out, I can see the leaves as well so if that's what the others are, that's yarrow. 

I was given something I've been after for ages today. A friend has just moved house and has some of those big yellow brandy bottle water lilies. He waded in and got me some out. 

04/08/2013 at 17:58

And those corn marigolds look splendid

04/08/2013 at 22:06

Thanks Nutcutlet - it's great you've identified it for me.  I'm pleased you like

my marigolds and will make sure you get plenty of seeds.  On looking at the

wildflower garden this afternoon, I decided my best option was to pull out most

of the yarrow as it is taking it over and I don't want it to swamp the other flowers.

I felt very guilty doing it as it's so pretty but there would have been zillions of

seeds if I'd left it.  However, if you would like some seeds I have left a couple

of plants, but I expect you have to be careful with it, like cow parsley - I seem to

remember you told me that can be invasive if you leave too much of it to its

own devices!!  So pleased you've got your lillies Nutcutlet - well done!

04/08/2013 at 22:19

I'm OK for yarrow thanks, I don't have a problem with invasiveness as it grows in the rough tarmac and short grass/weeds that is my drive. I don't get that mny flowers but it carries on spreading.

I hope the water lilies will take, I haven't had much success with them previously but they were cultivated ones donated by other friends. I've got 2 pieces in pots and when my fisherman's waders are delivered I'll get in and plant them deeper in the pond in the mud at the bottom. the other piece I've put straight in the mud and pegged it down with a forked stick. I'll keep an eye on them, they do like to float off

04/08/2013 at 22:23

I love water lillies, but have to be content seeing them in the wild, as I

don't have any ponds.  When they get going for you would love to see a

photo!!

04/08/2013 at 22:25

I'll take one. I should have taken a photo of them being pulled out. 

06/08/2013 at 10:34

Great!  I look forward to that!  Sorry if my posts are a bit erratic at

the moment - I'm besieged by grandchildren wanting to go places!

I'm trying very hard to get my eight year old grandson interested in

gardening and so far he quite likes it, especially when he sees the

flowers growing, as he helped me sow the seeds.  

06/08/2013 at 12:42

Echinops (globe thistle) the purple and the white flowering varieties are very good for bees. Mine are covered in them as soon as they open. Lavender and shasta daisies are good too.

07/08/2013 at 14:25

Thanks Gardenmaiden - I have lots of lavender, but no globe thistles or shasta

daisies, so will try those too (maybe have the shasta daisies in my garden

rather than wildflower garden though as I don't think they are wild flowers?

09/08/2013 at 22:19

Hi Nutcutlet,,

Today I found another wildflower growing amongst my cornflowers, cornmarigolds

and poppies - I haven't a clue what it is and wonder if you could tell me please?

 I'll post two photos for you to see, but they'll have to be seperate as I don't seem

to be able to figure out how to send them together!  It's the purple flower - not

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/29089.jpg?width=270&height=350&mode=max

many of them have come out yet, but there are a lot of buds.

There's no rush with this Nutcutlet, just wanted to send you a

picture.  Have a lovely weekend! 

 

 

09/08/2013 at 22:23

Looks like a corncockle

10/08/2013 at 00:00

Fidgetbones - thank you - I have checked online and your are right!!

Nutcutlet I have PM'd you!

10/08/2013 at 11:38

Hi ffb, I've replied

10/08/2013 at 15:21

URGENT MESSAGE FOR COUNTRY DWELLERS!  I'm posting this as I've been

incredibly silly today without realising it and I want to save as many people as

possible from making the same mistake.  I went for a walk in the New Forest and

was enjoying watching two little foals playing together.  A little further on I noticed

Ragwort growing by the path I was on and I pulled it up as I know it is very

poisonous for ponies/horses/deer etc. (I had seen an article on it in the Daily

Mail earlier in the year).  In all I probably found and pulled up around ten plants.

It wasn't easy as they were quite well rooted.  I disposed of them, before I got

into the car, in a place horses wouldn't be able to get to.  On returning home I

did a bit of research on line and found out that you should never pull Ragwort up

unless you are wearing gloves (and preferably a face mask to protect from the

spores).  It seems the poison from these plants can enter your bloodstream and

damage your liver.  I don't want to be an alarmist, but at the same time I think

that probably people should be made more aware of the dangers of this very

prolific plant - especially children, who could be attracted by its bright yellow

flowers and think they would be nice to pick.  Hope this is helpful to some of you.

10/08/2013 at 21:48

http://www.ragwortfacts.com/ragwort-poisoning-in-humans.html

I've handled a lot of ragwort and I'm still here.

10/08/2013 at 21:52

I'm so relieved you told me that Nutcutlet - there's any awful lot of very

negative stuff about that plant online and it had me worried.

10/08/2013 at 22:14

I think that so long as you don't eat it you should  be OK

12/08/2013 at 19:38

Hi Nutcutlet - I've just PM'd you - sorry -  I only just read your PM to me!

12/08/2013 at 19:54

Used to pull it up all the time when I worked with horses for twenty years. Still here another twenty years on! 

Hasn't affected me at all...

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