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21 to 28 of 28 messages
27/08/2013 at 16:44

I planted a clematis Montana over a Leylandii stump.  I left it at about 6' with as many spurs on its trunk as possible and encased it with trellis.  I also used 3 galvanised poles as a wigwam to ensure longevity.  Did this for a friend some 6 or 7 years ago and it looks wonderful.  No sign of any support or Leylandii.

When I have removed such conifers ....did this last year.....I mixed as much compost, manure and,top soil. (from my veg garden) as possible Imto the site.  At plantImg time I added generous quantities of fish look no bone.  This summer the new plantIngs have been fantastic loving the comditions.

27/08/2013 at 18:18

Went to visit an NGS garden last week and they had an enormous tree that must have been hit by lightning or something. A huge branch had broken half off so instead of removing it they put a big post opposite, leant the broken branch on the top of the post, making a big square arch, and grew Montana up the dead tree and an Akebia up the post. Looked amazing! 

29/08/2013 at 22:51

Bump - for Blueboots

30/08/2013 at 08:09

Thanks Chicky!

This has given me more info on getting out my two conifers. I also like the idea of growing clematis up a dead tree. I have a dead leyland in a hedge (miserable things but can't face pulling them all out). If I can dig a hole big enough to accommodate a clematis (with a heap of decent compost and nutrients) it may hide the gap in the hedge and even look good.

The awful russian vine did well there (till I declared war), maybe a clematis will too. once it gets to the hedge it will have a serious amount of sunshine.

 

30/08/2013 at 09:00

addict- sorry for taking so long to reply. Unfortunately the stump is right where the new lawn will be but i'll keep chopping away at the top of it till it's low enough to be covered with soil etc for the grass.  Failing that the lawn can be shorter in lengtgh, but I'd still have the same prob as it would be part of the path instead! 

30/08/2013 at 09:16

Fairy, could you make the stump a temporary base for pot?

I removed couple of large shrubs few years back to make a perennial border.  Left the stumps there, albeit just below,the soil surface.  (not my style really...I usually dig up whole stump).  Used SBK on them.  The stumps have never been seen and each year      another chunk is chopped off.  Now they have almost gone

30/08/2013 at 09:39

It's slap bang in the middle of the garden Verd. I don't need to get it all out as I'll need to sort the levels out for the new lawn and it's slightly lower where it is anyway.  If I can get a few more inches off it it'll be fine. BIL got a bit of it off last week but broke the axe! I cut away about 6 or 7 roots round the main trunk but the roots are the thickness of my arm and there's one going vertically from the base so there's little chance of getting it cut. It's completely dead but rock solid- there might even be another vertical one. I'll keep chipping away at it - may get lucky!

31/08/2013 at 11:50

When removing a large stump from our garden, I found a crowbar very handy for splilling roots. Either make a groove with an axe to allow it it or if they are a little bit soft, you can actually hammer it in and then lever away!

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21 to 28 of 28 messages