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17 messages
13/07/2014 at 16:53

I have been offered an acer grisium which is probably about 10-15 years old.  It is in a place where it has never thrived, they have another one planted at the same time which is more than 3 times as big.  If I can manage to move it, will it thrive?  Will the new growth be out of proportion to the old?  The bark doesn't look great, will it recover?  Does anyone know?

13/07/2014 at 16:58

Let's see a photo

It might be worth a try in the dormant season if you can get a big enough root ball. Large trees do get moved. 

http://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/197/Acer-griseum/Details

Does the bark look like this?

 

13/07/2014 at 17:04

It is paler and its hard to see the bark under the peelings which are all over the trunk. I know what it should look like (picture) but this looks different.

Thanks for quick response.  I'll have to go back and get a photo, didn't think of it at the time

13/07/2014 at 17:08

It will be hard work so make sure you like the look of it before you start

13/07/2014 at 17:14

Good point!

13/07/2014 at 17:45

Only a partial answer to your question, but I planted out a healthy AG in the ground which I had been growing in a pot. I kept it well watered because it often look thirsty. Now doing well. A pot grown specimen could be planted at any time, but moving one is trickier. Water well for a week before you do it, take a large rootball and plant in pre-prepared hole, with some good humus matter. Water well. Mulch also.

13/07/2014 at 18:11

Just went and took a photo and can't upload it.....grr.  But I now find that its maybe 18 years old, about 10ft high.  The trunk and one main branch are less 'peely' but two other branches look exactly as they should.  I have removed an old tie which was too tight, but doesn't seem to have damaged it so just in time.  The other tree which is the same age is about 30 feet high, in a much better place.  So, if anyone knows if new growth will look very different (more vigorous) I would be grateful to know. Thanks for existing replies.

13/07/2014 at 18:21

Impossible to say Meadow. Sometimes a bad start in life is something a plant can't grow out of. But not always.

When we came here there were loads of stunted runts in the meadow. Poor soil, windy and exposed. We planted lots more trees/shrubs and most of the poor specimens took off when there was more shelter. We also moved an alder that was close to 10 foot to make way for a shed, that's a large tree now. (22 years)

KEF
13/07/2014 at 19:39

I thought AG were smallish slow growing trees isn't 30 feet in 18yrs unusual ? The one I know about is about a 15 feet after about as many if not more years, it is super healthy and is growing in ideal conditions. Meadow are you sure it is an acer G?

KEF
13/07/2014 at 19:44

I thought AG were smallish slow growing trees isn't 30 feet in 18yrs unusual ? The one I know about is about a 15 feet after about as many if not more years, it is super healthy and is growing in ideal conditions. Meadow are you sure it is an acer G?

http://s3.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/52369.jpg?width=350

 April last year before leaves.

13/07/2014 at 20:11

Definitely an acer grisium, although it isn't as full as yours, gone up instead of out, could be because it is a bit surrounded by tall hedge and building and must be growing up towards light.  Also I am not very good at estimating distances!

 

KEF
14/07/2014 at 07:39

Meadow I hope you can successfully transplant it  It's a lovely tree especially in the Autumn, which you'll know  Please tell us what happens.

14/07/2014 at 09:05

water it well (both before and after transplanting - and I mean SOAK it), keep it wet and the root ball covered while you transplant it and try and get as big of a root ball on it as possible.

bit of advice is to dig the hole that its going into first (it doesn't matter if its too big) that way it won't be sat out drying while you dig its new home.

14/07/2014 at 17:17

Which one is it in your picture KEF? The brown barked one on the left, or the smaller one to the right and in front?

KEF
14/07/2014 at 18:08

Woody the one on the left, brown bark.

http://s3.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/52484.jpg?width=350

 Early November last year just starting to colour.

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/52485.jpg?width=201&height=350&mode=max

 

14/07/2014 at 19:48

Lovely specimen of a favourite tree of mine.

KEF
14/07/2014 at 20:14

Thanks

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