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4 messages
28/07/2012 at 01:14

Would anyone be so kind as to suggest some shade loving plants for a wet shady area of my garden which faces North?

28/07/2012 at 07:18

How wet?  What sort of soil? How big an area are we looking at here?

28/07/2012 at 15:17

I have one of these next to our terrace.  The soil is a good loam but damp all year and wet in winter despite a drain being built on the other side between it and the lawn and which becomes a "canal" in winter.  It gets sun early morning and late afternoon between April and early September as there's no shade apart from our north facing house wall.

Plants - Japanese anemone, hardy ferns, chelone, astible, aquilegia, tall white primulas and cowslips, hostas, hakonechloa grass, astilboides, lily of the valley.   I did also have molinia grasses but they were the wrong scale so have been moved to another damp bed near my unlined pond.   There are also two golden/bronze  dwarf conifers but I can't remember which and the lawn side is bordered by a low hedge of another blue/green conifer with a white mark on its needles - again, name unknown.  I put wildlife friendly slug pellets down in early spring and again at regular intervals until early summer and this deals with most of teh slugs so teh hostas don't get full of holes.

 

29/07/2012 at 01:22

Hi Musical Cricketer,

I also have some shady areas and as I'm situated on the edge of Marsh Grazing Land we are pretty wet on heavy clay for most of the year in some parts of the garden.

For many of my 'wet/damp' shady areas I have gone for biggish architectural plants which sit nicely with ferns and hostas etc and make a shady area very interesting....

So here's my list of plants to add some 'wow' factor to your wet shady area for you...

  1. Darmera Peltata (umbrella plant)
  2. Rheum (wild rhubarb)
  3. Acantha Mollis (Bears Britches)
  4. Aruncus Dioircus (Goats Beard - like a giant Astilbe)
  5. Brunnera
  6. Gunnera (Magnicata is the large one but there are smaller ones worth looking for)
  7. Rodgersia Aesculifolia (lovely leaves and I've found fragrant flowers)
  8. Ligularia (various varieties to choose from)
  9. Astrantia will grow in damp shade and bees love them!
  10. Alchemilla Mollis (like Astrantia smaller than others I've mentioned)
Hope this helps and gives you something different to think about?   Higgy http://higgysgardenproject.blogspot.co.uk/
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