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Can anyone tell me what the red peppers mean on the forum page?
sotongeoff

Hot threads-but how they become hot is a bit random-there doesn't seem to be any visible criteria.

 

andyhguk

Most peppers,chillis,capsicums, whatever you want to call them, ripen up to be red, the riper and therefore the redder they are the hotter they are. This year we grew 16 different varieties some sweet, some hot, some volcanic. The hotter varieties definitely got much hotter as they got redder, the sweet varities seemed to vary some got sweeter as they ripened others seemed to get hotter, we also grew some that were never red, one strain went from green to lilac, one from purple to red with no green and one turned from green to chocolate. Now you are just as confused as I am, but I presume the varieties that do ripen to red are called red peppers when they are red and green peppers while they are still green, which means that a huge range of peppers turn red so it could be any type that are called red. Now you are even more confused than me I think.                       www.hanginggardenuk.com

sotongeoff
andyhguk wrote (see)

Most peppers,chillis,capsicums, whatever you want to call them, ripen up to be red, the riper and therefore the redder they are the hotter they are. This year we grew 16 different varieties some sweet, some hot, some volcanic. The hotter varieties definitely got much hotter as they got redder, the sweet varities seemed to vary some got sweeter as they ripened others seemed to get hotter, we also grew some that were never red, one strain went from green to lilac, one from purple to red with no green and one turned from green to chocolate. Now you are just as confused as I am, but I presume the varieties that do ripen to red are called red peppers when they are red and green peppers while they are still green, which means that a huge range of peppers turn red so it could be any type that are called red. Now you are even more confused than me I think.                       www.hanginggardenuk.com


Jolly interesting but unfortunately that was not what the question was about- it was about the red chilli symbol next to the thread listings-hence why they are called hot threads.

But on the plus side we all now know about chillis

I think you get the red chilli symbol when lots of folk have looked at the thread, even if they don't bother posting.

I bought a close friend of mine some chili seeds that produce a very rude-looking fruit.  I don't know if any of them germinated, but it was great seeing the look on her face at what she could potentially grow.

A whole new take on 'grow your own'!

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andyhguk

Sorry, I literally lost lost the thread on red peppers,

The rude looking ones are a capsicum annum, actually called willy chili, some people know them by an even ruder name "peter's penis".

Happy eating now you know that

Yep, I bought them on ebay with the very rude name.

I gave them to my friend with the words 'Now you can grow your own red hot willy, oops, I mean chilli'.

I am a very rude girl with some very rude friends.

andyhguk

This is starting to sound like an adult dating site. We are genuinly attempting to grow a world record chilli next year. see www.hanginggardenuk.com

The guiness book of records biggest weighed less than 3/4 lb. and was just over a foot long, that sounds impressive for a willy but not that big for a chilli. the record one was a numex big jim pepper, obviously well hung.

figrat
Hahaha! Just googled the capsicum annum! That's a must for next year!

Was the world record one an actual hot chilli, or a sweet pepper?  3/4lb doesn't sound that big, having said that I wouldn't want to eat it if it was a hot chilli, but I don't like very hot/spicy things anyway (I do, however, eat pickled chillis, they're lush).

Figrat, I will ask my friend if any of hers germinated.  This would be something to really embarass prudish freinds/mother in laws.  You could make a joke of it by hanging a pair of your old pants over it, almost, but not quite covering the fruits up!  I am going now, before I start getting giddy and making it sound like one of those premium rate telephone services for gentlemen of dubious tastes.

figrat
I was thinking more along the lines of a garnish...something simple, like a couple of Gardener's Delight, and maybe some curly parsley...

Stand by with a strong beer, as some smart alec will try eating it.  Hmmm, gardener's delight and the willy chilli, it will look like something's been out in the sun for FAR too long!

I don't really 'get' garnishes, as if there's something on my plate I will try eating it.  I would definitely draw the line at the capsicum annum though. 

Lilylouise

A few years ago I grew some Peter Peppers

http://i50.photobucket.com/albums/f350/streptocarpus/150709045.jpg

 Pam LL x

Do they actually turn red?  And do they go a funny colour like most peppers in between?  That looks like it should be covered up by the incredible Hulk's trousers!!

Lilylouise

There are some Peter Peppers on the right hand side of the photo

Pam LL x

http://i50.photobucket.com/albums/f350/streptocarpus/onionschilliesandmarrows002.jpg

 

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Glad they turn red- a green one doesn't seem right somehow!  I think I will have to grow some of these, just to embarass my Mum when she comes across from Spain next year.  I don't like raw/cooked chillis, so will see if I can find out how you pickle them (they are nice that way, as you get the taste of the chilli without the heat).  That will make my sister-in-law blush when I get the pickles out next Christmas!!

LisaJ

I have to get some seeds for next year!  

 

artjak

Dear andyhguk, Have just looked at your website about hydroponics, can you tell me what you do with the highly nutritious water after you have grown the plants?

andyhguk

Very little nutrient left in the water at the end .We run the plants virtually dry before topping up, and at the very end, "dependant on plant", we only top up with water, this causes the plant to use up it's own store of nutrients and gives much cleaner tasting produce. Commercial growers cannot do this as they need to keep a high nutrient level, to ensure the produce is firm and thick skinned so it travels well, which is detrimental to taste. What little is left over works wonders on the bedding plants in the garden.

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