London (change)
Today 12°C / 10°C
Tomorrow 12°C / 5°C
21 to 30 of 30 messages
29/09/2011 at 13:25
Hi Mark Gardening? Natural? No! But it can be controlled nature, especially if your post garden-makeover regime is wildlife-friendly, as practised by Happymarion amongst others. Then I'm sure the wildlife will return.
01/10/2011 at 16:31
I have not cut the grass since february. The cats love to hide in the grass,and the spiders hunt in the long swards. Wildlife is at peace with the surroundings. Unfortunately The slugs and snails are out in force!
02/10/2011 at 07:49
And have you noticed how much quieter your world is without the constant noise of the mower, Catherine? Good for you. You just need to encourage hedgehogs and frogs and birds in great variety to your garden and grow plants that slugs ignore and you will have a garden which is heaven to you and the wildlife.
02/10/2011 at 14:50
we have three large trees in our small garden,all have preservation orders on them,we are forever clearing up acorns and cones from the ground bags and bags,as we are getting older we find it harder to keep tidy each year,could we leave the leaves on the bordes in winter and will they rot down without harming the plants we have in garden and could we leave the there without cleaning them off next year ,thankyou for any info
02/10/2011 at 16:32
The leaves will probably benefit most of your plants,Sally. Just check none of them are being swamped so that they cannot breathe while they still have leaves on. When perennials have retreated underground the layer of litter on top will keep them safe from frost damage. I am 83 and have a large garden with mature trees - willow,oak, pine, eucalyptus, tulip tree, gingko biloba, Indian bean tree,nut trees, huge apple ,pear and plum trees, and the only thing I do is dig out seedling trees in the spring. I've learnt how to cope from the Botanic Garden which has very mature, wonderful trees all round the site,but still mulches with leaf mould, shredded bark etc. to save the roots from harm in harsh winters.
03/10/2011 at 18:12
hello happymarion,thankyou for the advice i will do just that ,iwill keep my eye on the plants during the winter.i feel much happier now knowing i can leave the leaves there untill the spring.and hope we dont get a harsh winter, thankyou again
12/10/2011 at 18:57
how can we convince people not to tidy up too much in autumn. one person wrote to our local press with the fact they were worried when the council green wheelie bin service was being reduced over the next five months.i sugggested that they should have no problem if they leave the leaves to rot in a black bag if they feel they need to tidy them up and not to prune or remove plant foliages until spring to allow hibinating creatures and birds to shelter and find tasty morsals of insects and seeds. how can we educate tidy gardeners to change their ways?
14/10/2011 at 07:21
Thanks for sharing a wonderful post.
23/10/2011 at 09:51
There is something vaguely comforting about this time of year – it’s as if we’re ‘all in it together’. We can enjoy some bright warm days but we’re also starting to snuggle down for the winter. My veg plants benefit from the extra warmth provided by fleece and cloches. I like to keep out the cold by drinking twice as many cups of tea.
28/11/2011 at 18:44
I totally agree!! I always think the fallen leaves make a lovely mulch on the ground for next year!!
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21 to 30 of 30 messages