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18 messages
29/03/2008 at 22:03
I did exactly the same.For 3 yrs i had a lovely yellow and a red begonia,took them out of pots each year.Then i thought i would try leaving them when i went to replant them there was practicaly nothing there.I was really annoyed with myself,so wont be doing that again
11/04/2008 at 08:51
Am growing begonias from tubers for the first time this year, would love any advice on how to get the best from them.
18/04/2008 at 22:28
I am a novice, but a keen gardener and I too am about to pot some begonia tubers for the first time. Any advice? Also, I have the dreaded Marestail weed shooting up around my garden. Any advice to get rid it it before it takes over?
07/07/2008 at 18:08
my dark red begonia planted as tuber in April has beautiful huge flowers but leaves blotchy an pale despite fertilizer granules. Any suggestions?
14/09/2008 at 14:13
I have had a wonderful show of Begonias in my garden this year, I would love to be able to store them over the winter. Does anyone have any ideas of how I could do this?
28/09/2008 at 18:56
I have some lovely Begonia Bonfires which are still going strong. When should I lift? Should I cut back the stems? I did leave them in the pot last year protected with straw and bubble wrap and they overwintered very well but have outgrown the pot this year. Any advice
07/03/2009 at 10:57
Please help me, I'm a novice gardener. I bought a begonia bonfire last year and was advised to winter it in the garage which I did. Now I've brought it out in to the house and all I can see is the tuber just above the soil. Should I start watering it, should I re-pot it? I have no idea what to do ... any thoughts? Thanks. Michelle
17/03/2009 at 08:10
I bought a begonia plant from the local supermarket 2 weeks ago. It seems squashed into a small pot. Unfortunately I don't the name of it. However, the sales notice said that it could be an indoor or outdoor plant.If you think I should keep it indoors,should I repot it. Thank you. Cynthia.
04/04/2009 at 13:04
Just found my very first Begonia tuber still in its brown paper bag from the shop. I'd forgotten about it and it must have been there on the kitchen counter for at least six weeks. Yes, yes, I know,I am not a very good housewife :-) Four lovely sprouts,so far so good. Very accommodating plant obviously. Stuck it in a 8 inch wide terracotta drainpipe in the greenhouse border. But.......I can't find out anywhere HOW DEEP TO PLANT THE THING. I left most of it exposed in a peaty mixture and must have a feel for begonias because I put in a thin bamboo structure without being told. Just read here that this is a good idea, in order to support the hopefully coming stems. So do I have to bury the entire tuber or can I leave it with over half sticking out?
06/04/2009 at 10:29
Reply to Blue Shimmer, I sparingly cover tubers with compost. You may have heard that some bulbs can be planted with their tops sticking well clear of the compost, but begonias aren't one of these. As some tubers are very concave, water can settle in them and cause rotting if watered from above. Either water very carefully around teh sides of the tuber to avoid this, or water from below.
19/04/2009 at 18:44
I am a novice gardener and would like some advice on Begonias. A friend has just given me two tubers and told me to soak them in a small amount of water before planting (they are concave up). I don't have a garden, only a patio area and therefore all my flowers are in pots and baskets. Will the begonias take in a pot? Also, what other flowers would you recommend for shaded areas?
20/04/2009 at 10:21
Redderry, tuberous begonias are fine in pots, and many people only grow them in pots, particularly the large-flowered varieties. Lots of flowers grow well in shade, but your choice does depend on just how dense the shade is. Does it get any sun at all, even for part of the day? Whole books have been written on plants for shade but some of my favourites include Brunnera 'Jack Frost', epimedium, ferns, variegated ivy, hellebores and some cranesbills.
10/06/2009 at 17:15
I bought begonias for hanging baskets a few years ago and dried them off in the autumn, storing them in old fat-ball tubs in sand. They survived and grew larger, they were a bit heavy for the baskets the next year. By the third year they were massive so I put them in terracotta bowls around a bird bath & they flopped all over the edge, killing the grass they were quite monsterous and would hardly fit in the sand tubs. As they seemed to have several distinct 'eyes' I sawed them up with a bread knife & have again put them in the bowls, which I will try to site in a more elevated position, hoping the heavy flowers won't break the fleshy stems. Are they likely to continue increasing in size like this?
24/12/2009 at 17:50
every third watering one level teaspoon of jeyes fluid to a gallon of water,results no vine wevil.And begonias are not house plants.Once grown they like shade and careful with the watering,only water when dry.another trick is to take off the show of buds.Then take off the two side flowers of the main flowrs,then be amased.Roy
15/02/2011 at 08:26
I have stored my begonias dry and under a bed ! trouble is they are sprouting but I am worried it will be too cold for them if I plant them in my unheated greenhouse and I don't really have anywhere to put them indoors. Will they be OK in the greenhouse?
29/05/2011 at 09:45
what do you mean "take off the show of buds" ? or is it a typing error ? does the Jeys work for other plants too ?
01/11/2011 at 10:21
I put a black sack over my begonias over winter , until last year , i lifted them and put them in a bedroom, covered them with sawdust and this year they were great, fed them with miracle grow twice, and they were beautiful, hope this helps.
28/11/2011 at 18:31
Catherine, I hope your begonia tubers are producing shoots now. Start tubers in small pots, planting with the concave surface upwards, as shoots develop from this side. As roots develop and fill the compost so you can pot this tuber up into a pot just one size larger. By July you'll have reached a pot perhaps 15cm across, and I'd recommend choosing a heavier terracotta pot for this, and NOT a lightweight plastic one. Why? A heavier pot, preferably a shallow and wide style, offers greater stability for tall, top-heavy begonias as they come into flower. Use thin split canes pushed into the compost to hold shoots upright and prevent them falling over.
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18 messages