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41 to 60 of 64 messages
03/04/2009 at 22:30
Well! there is a lot to be said,lets face it we can't all like the same thing but I think a blind man would love to see it, must addmit I love most plants and colours, and I think James was just trying to get you all going.
04/04/2009 at 08:52
I have always loved forsythia and brought cuttings from my old house to my new one. They are flowering now, beautifully. So far as the foliage is boring, my garden sparrows were very fond of its great density and cover. The bird feeders fitted in it just perfectly. Each to his own.
04/04/2009 at 19:54
this poor plant cannot be but pitied, it is usually chopped into a geometric cube so the postman can get past it, it must be the most maligned plant when it comes to planting a plant in the wrong place. now what i really hate is the hebe variety supermarket car park
04/04/2009 at 21:24
I have a bush of Ribes. I do not know why I still have it but I hate rubbing against it. It is really Cat Pee - Forsythia I do not have but it looks great creeping over my neighbours fence in Spring peeping through the dark conifers.
05/04/2009 at 11:57
On the 16th May 2009 my husband and I took over the tenancy of small semi-detached Edwardian house in Trench,Telford. The attraction was the garden or more accurately the 134x20ft space behind where a garden should have been. In its place we found weeds in all their glorious profusion, revelling in a freedom which must have lasted for decades. There were docks vying for skylight with three very sick fruit trees and to top it all, hiding behind a drunken fence, at the bottom of this delight, was a heap of rubble eight feet square--at a guess. This had been deposited by itinerant fly-tippers who had access to the area from a redundant railway embankment. Why didn't we run? Good question, but I enjoy creating gardens and my Husband and I could see the potential for an excellent food supply, relaxation and a wild garden orchard at the far end. To prevent this from becoming a novel I shall list the progress. 1. Weeding. We had to poison the docks and couch grass. 2 Digging! Ha! This beautiful earth had bee used to bury anything from bricks, metal, glass and wood and not one fork or spade failed to contact some obstacle. We dug out the foundations of four walls and ended up with enough bricks to build a large extention, enough metal to construct a one man space ship sufficient glass to make a large model of the Crystal Palace and a very large quantity of wood with which to make things you make with wood. 3. We had to get a contracter to remove the rubble pile. A complete bathroom suite, fifteen half telegraph poles, tree trunks and-------!!?? The other day we watched you beginning the creation of another garden and envied you that sympathetic earth but inspite of all obstacles our garden is now planted and about venture into the world that it deserves. 4. Our lawn area was laid yesterday. (Not by us!) 5. Eventually we had to have some help from a gardener. Paul enabled us to reach our deadline of March for trees and bushes. That as briefly as I can say it is our story and I would have sent some Photo's but although I can claim a certain tinge of Green in my fingers, I do not, unfortunately possess " Screen fingers" to send them with this letter. By the way I don't think I mentioned that I am seventy-nine and my toy boy is seventy-seven. We shall be following your progress with interest and look forward to learning more of this now essential art. With very best wishes, Joy and Peter Cox
05/04/2009 at 16:33
forsythia- i just love it
05/04/2009 at 18:27
Ha. I saw the title of the blog and thought "oooh - that'll rattle a few cages". I don't like it and won't have it in the garden - SomeBeans calls me a plant snob. I think what makes it worse is when you see them turned into 'lollipops'. I drive past a string of these bright yellow lollipops on the way to and from work and keep meaning to stop and take photos of the horrible deformed things.
06/04/2009 at 14:20
My forsythia and ribes hide an old shed, under an enormous sycamore, which really is a tree to condemn (too big and prolific), at the back of the garden. Nothing else grows under it, but these 2 shrubs light up that dark place and I know spring has arrived. Although the forsythia was under threat of removal if it didn't flower well this year - and it has, so it is saved.
06/04/2009 at 15:42
I love my forsythia and I'm genuinely surprised to discover anyone who doesn't feel the same way about this pretty and delightful plant, but you are entitled to your opinion and the world would be a fairly boring and mundane place if we all liked exactly the same plants.
06/04/2009 at 20:04
Dear James - as a child I used to complain that the Springtime yellow everywhere of forsythia and daffodils was really 'boring'. Older, wiser and living further north, I now celebrate the vibrancy of colour after dull, dark winter days, and the fact that they manage to thrive in our dreadful clay soil. Each to his own as they say...
07/04/2009 at 11:24
I once published a poem about forsythia. I take great delight in picking bare branches in January and watching them flower in their vase ten days later. Their are many species that are not violent yellow and some are of weeping habit.
07/04/2009 at 17:44
Well. that put a cat amongst the pigeons! The result of a rough poll amongst your comments is: 32 of you like Forsythia 15 of you do not and 5 of you are pretty indifferent So it seems that the violent yellow flowers and dreary foliage is here to stay. As some of you say, Vive la Difference. If we all liked the same things then our gardens would be terribly dull places. I hope that you enjoyed the comments as much as I did. (A special thanks to Joy and Peter Cox whose story of their emerging garden was delightful - especially as there was no mention of Forsythia - I sympathise with your rubble trouble if you go and look at http://www.blackpitts.co.uk/frameset.html?blackpitts you will see my original rubble pile!)
12/04/2009 at 09:08
My Forsythia lets me know that Spring has arrived. It brightens up even the dullest of days. I love it :-)
12/04/2009 at 23:25
Oh joy! Someone who dislikes forsythia as much as I do. It is nice to know that I am not the only soul with an intense dislike of this plant. Have you ever tried to get rid of it? I'm in the process now and am truly amazed by how it roots everywhere it touches the ground...and speaking of roots - they travel 4-5 feet underground and then pop up as a whole new bush. Ahhh, the aggravation of it all.
14/04/2009 at 09:41
Forsythia suspensa growing in the middle distance in light woodland to counteract a nearby patch of daffodils: lovely. Forsythia X intermedia cut into what I describe as a 'tethered balloon' shape and planted between a blue Chamaecyparis & an Aucuba: vile. The plant is not to blame, but the gardener is. No plant should be discriminated against because of its ease to grow and colourfulness. It's snobbery, and unfounded too, if you listen to the Duke of Argyll's advice on how to become a good gardener,'Find out what grows well: and plant a lot of them.'
19/04/2009 at 01:24
I'm not fond of forsythia, the person who lived here before me had planted one in completely the wrong place and my son had to remove a fence panel and tow the roots out using his people carrier. My bugbear is totally colour coordinated gardens, each to their own but I love bright colours, reds, blues, yellows, oranges, and I love to swap plants with neighbours and friends. When I moved here a couple of years ago there was little in the garden but the forsythia bush and although the garden is tiny most of it has been planted with things I have been given or swapped and I think it is starting to look good, the garden is evolving rather than being planned and I'm also growing vegetables, most of which I've started from seed and am growning in containers. All in all I'm having a great deal of fun without spending lots of money and when I look at the plants I think of the friends that gave them to me.
20/04/2009 at 15:57
Good for you, Chatname. That is what gardening should be about. Enjoy yourself.
19/07/2009 at 02:47
No Way! Forsythia is a full on, in your face, sign of Spring. What a delight after a long dark winter. I have two ancient hedges the entire length of my garden. When in flower it brightens up even the dullest day and lifts the heart! So there!
11/01/2010 at 13:39
i just love the forsythia bush..i have recently moved houde, and had to leave my lovely bush behind,,gonna go get another for my new garden,,i love the yellow flower..it makes my happy, as it shows the first sign of nicer weather ...love love love forsythia!!!!
28/02/2010 at 06:53
Spring session bring delightful for every creature glasshouse
41 to 60 of 64 messages