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24/11/2011 at 15:27
I have just bought my first greenhouse and spent all day yesterday planting up my seeds. I have gone veg mad. I will grow my tomatoes in there as i usual grow them outside but have not had much fruits for the last few years. If anyone could give me any tips would really like to here. happy gardening.
24/11/2011 at 15:28
Have got first veg patch, got plenty growing have eaten cauli already with caterpillar. carrots are doing well but popping out of soil, do i cover them back up, like you do with potatoes? Toms are doing brill but again confused about side shoots, they are getting heavy as got plenty toms on them, have tied them up, do i just keep eye on the shoots?
24/11/2011 at 15:28
The thing that is not covered here is whether or not to remove some of the actual large leaves as well as pinching out the shoots that appear in between the large leaves and the main stem.

I've been told by one person to take off most leaves because the energy then goes into the fruit and by someone else to leave them on because they are acting as an energy absorber.
I'm up to two trusses of fruit now so any advice would be gratefully received.
24/11/2011 at 15:28
I have always found your static guides extremely useful and rarely need to ask a supplementary question. However I do have a question about your video projects. I ALWAYS have trouble viewing them.. I have successfully installed the latest Adobe Flash, Java, you name it, I've done it - uninstalled - reinstalled and still nothing. I have emailed you for advice, asked you if their is a problem your end, still nothing. I have no trouble watching your latest Volkswagen adverts!!
24/11/2011 at 15:28
I just have little seedlings at the moment about to break into their first set of true leaves. This is my first time growing tomatoes so hopefully all will go well!
24/11/2011 at 15:28
i am growing tomatoes they are about 3 months and still live in a small pot what pot woulld be sutible for them
24/11/2011 at 15:28
It gives a useful overview. As a complete newbie to tomato growing, what I would really find helpful is larger, close up images ( or diagrams) to such processes as - 'pinching-out' and developing and tying in stems etc. I have looked at a few sites ( and books) to try and get a clearer visual demonstration of these processes and have found them all much the same. As a complete novice, I need an 'Idiots Guide'!
24/11/2011 at 15:29
certainly 5 star
26/12/2011 at 20:29
I WANT TO KNOW THE BEST WAY TO GROW TOMATOES USING RING CULTURE. DO I NEED TO PUT A LINER UNDER THE GRVEL OR DOES THE WATER NEED TO RUN AWAY, BUT KEEP WATERING ONTO THE GRAVEL.
08/04/2012 at 15:24
This is my first year growing vegetables in a greenhouse. A fellow greenhouse owner said that putting tomato plants on the floor will strength and thicken the stems. Is this true?
13/04/2012 at 11:38
Can you use parrafin heaters in your greenhouse when growing tomatoes
15/04/2012 at 16:48
what about growing tomatoes in the same greenhouse every year
15/04/2012 at 17:35

This link with its pictures might help;

http://www.thegardenersalmanac.co.uk/Data/Tomato/Tomato.htm

16/04/2012 at 12:44

The thing that is not covered here is whether or not to remove some of the actual large leaves as well as pinching out the shoots that appear in between the large leaves and the main stem.

I've been told by one person to take off most leaves because the energy then goes into the fruit and by someone else to leave them on because they are acting as an energy absorber.
I'm up to two trusses of fruit now so any advice would be gratefully received.

The only real reason to remove foliage from a tomato plant is to aid air circulation to help against fungal problems. Cluttered foliage and no air circulation are the fungal spores' friends.

Nipping off the laterals - the side shoots - can help the anti-fungal cause. It used to be said that removing the laterals increased production. Testing has proved that it doesn't.

It's also possible to remove some excess foliage on the same basis. It's a matter of striking a balance. Foliage is essential to the plant for (a) photosynthesis; and (b) protecting the fruit from direct, hot sun and the chance of sunscald (sunburn). On these bases, removing all the foliage is the last thing you'd want to do.

16/04/2012 at 13:28

I place 2 grow bags on top of one and another and make holes in the top bag so the toms can be planted Before planting the seedlings, using a dibber I punch through the base of the top bag into the one underneath (room for the roots to grow through). I find my toms dont split then as I cannot water the same time every day. I also remove my leaves so that there is more air circulation but only because my plants are tightly packed into the greenhouse. I tried growing up strings last year, and found it really easy, so I will be doing the same this year for both toms and cucumbers.

16/04/2012 at 19:36

http://i1131.photobucket.com/albums/m551/lilylouise1/campsis021.jpg

This is how I grow my Tomatoes - I always get a good crop   Flower buckets with the bottoms cut out are placed over holes in the grobags

Pam x

18/04/2012 at 15:00

Nibsy, Dig out around six inches of greenhouse bed, put down a heavy liner and put your garden fork through it in several places. Now cover with pea gravel.

You will need to use 10-12 inch bottomless pots or rings made from stiff plastic, place them on the gravel, it is best to put some plastic or thin wood under the pot first, this keeps the compost in place until you compact it a little. Fill the pot about half way with good compost, you can use glow bag compost for this and then slowly withdraw the plastic or wood under the pot, let that settle and warm up keeping it slightly damp.

My way is to put the small pots the tomato is in untill it has set the first fruit (tiny green lumps behind the flower) into the rings on the gravel and let them aclimatise, a few days later drop the plant out of the small pot and into the ring, water in and leave.

When all around me had blight I had tomato's right up to October, they need a bit of care. The bottemless pot allows the water through to the roots in the gravel where it is needed though the main pot still needs to be slightly damp. When you have a few trusses set then top up the pot with fresh compost, do this a couple of times as the plant grows. Tie the plants to canes or strings with loose ties, take out the side shoots that grow from the leaf axle and when the first trusses are fully ripe then remove some of the bottom leaves. When it gets late in the year if you still have fruit remove the leaves on the sunny side so the fruit will ripen.

I hope this answers some of your queries but come back if in doubt, I have grown tomato's for many years mostly with success although saying that Money Maker are prolific but I do not grow them as I think they are not very tasty.

Frank.

08/05/2012 at 17:49
Ive had great success from baby yellow plum varieties keeping as little leaf growth and shots as possible and growing runners out on string. has given me very good crops off each plant. But little success from larger varieties my plants seem to end up stunted and with only two or three on it by the end of the summer, any idea's what I could be doing wrong

I feed with a branded tomato food as stated and use the same grow bags which contain seaweed.

I cant get why the cherry type varietys go mad but I struggle else where. Thanks in advance for any advice
08/09/2012 at 14:40
Why are my tomatoes splitting and have brown grain marks on them prior to them being ripe? Some are also quite mushy.
08/09/2012 at 22:38

hi marion,your tomatoes are splitting because of irregular watering...

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