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11 messages
13/12/2008 at 14:27
yes I agree wooden composts cool down much more easily that the plastic one because my plastic one has not slowed down and I have not been composting for long. Also again the wooden ones are not rat proof, but they are fine for prunings and grass cuttings.
18/12/2008 at 22:48
i have a 10 year old monkey puzzle tree which has turned brown and is louseing its scale,s..any idea,s or help or is it dieing...
19/12/2008 at 09:52
I have been offered free horse manure from a stable. On looking at the heap I have the choice of half rotted strawy composition or some fully rotted dark black mass. I would normally think of the latter as being best but seem to remember having heard that a strawy material is better. Has anyone views on this?
19/12/2008 at 12:33
Having recently moved into a new area where the soil is heavy clay, I have incorportated masses of grit, peat free compost and farmyard manure into my two large vegetable plots. Having had a brain-wave about raised beds, I decided to dig down to make the paths rather than order in extra topsoil which would have to be carted down to the bottom of our 45 metre garden. Problem - the garden slopes down toward the vegetable area which is not a bad thing for moisture but, the path at the bottom is flooded! I've been thinking about digging down further, adding more grit, popping pallets down as a raised path then covering the whole lot with bark chippings. Could anyone suggest an alternative solution please?
01/01/2009 at 19:41
Regarding Pippa's dormant compost,you could try using Bokashi. The EMs (Effective Microorganisms) in the special Bokashi Bran sprinkled onto each 2" layer of food waste in a bucket, pickle it anaerobically. After 2-3weeks it can be added to a conventional compost heap, added in small quantities to a wormery, or put directly into a pre-dug trench (great for Runner Beans), and covered with a layer of soil. Once there, the aerobic bacteria take over the rotting process, and it decomposes faster than normal kitchen waste does in the same situation. The Bokashi also renders the material unattractive to vermin. Another great thing about Bokashi is that you can compost cooked food, including meat and dairy, and small bones. Worth a try I reckon. Google the name "Terua Higa", the Japanese scientist who discovered EMs. Makes fascinating reading.
07/01/2009 at 11:03
MY COMPO IS THE SAME AS MOST OF YOURS ,ITS IN A BLACK PLASTIC BIN AND SIMPLY WONT ROT ,THOUGHT ABOUT THE NATURAL WAY OF ACCELERATION,YOU KNOW !!! WATER IN ONE END THEN OUT THE OTHER.AFTER DRINKING COPIOUSE AMOUNTS OF TEA AND THE ODD GUINNESS I SIMPLY COULDNT MAKE IT TO THE COMPO BIN AND HAD TO RUSH TO THE LAVVY UPSTAIRS,LOL. MAY TRY LATER AS I HAVE HEARD ITS AVERY GOOD SOLUTION.
06/02/2009 at 13:37
The only thing I've found to really accelerate the composting process is the Rocket...http://rockycompost.blogspot.com...it turns large quantities of garden waste into lovely compost in about 14 days. It'll even take food waste and turn that into delicious compost too. Better than my own heap which can take a number of months...even with "nature's accelerator"!
07/05/2009 at 15:10
Hello, I have recently been given an allotment plot that was previously uncultivated and full of bricks and weeds. Someone keeps putting banana skins on my allotment - at exactly the places that I am cultivating next. Is this something sinister or do you think they are trying to help the soil ? Sensible suggestions please, as it is winding me up !
11/11/2009 at 20:35
I PUT BANANA SKINS IN MY COMPOST HEAP AND IT DOSE NO HARM SO I CARNT SEE ANY HARM IT CAN DO ON THE GROND
26/03/2010 at 19:23
my compost is lacking worms ! I have even introduced worms from my sisters compost bin but have no evidence of worm activity in my compost heaps. when I remove the top layer of material the rest seems to have composted and I use it as a mulch in my garden borders but NO WORMS . incidently last year I used the suggestion from the magazine to immerse weeds in a bin of water. I then used the water as a fertiliser and composted the remaining plant material .The fertiliser / water certainly smelled strong enough to be good for the garden!
28/11/2011 at 18:37
The truth is those wooden slatted composters are 'something and nothing', fine for grass clipping and soft prunings. However they are not rat proof or heat retaining. So food waste is best in the black plastic composters which have a base and a lid. When it comes to warmth you can't beat the big heap, I am talking 3+ cubic metres, sides or no sides. At this time of year I come in with a turned downed fork and pull off the crust, which becomes the base of next years heap. Then barrow out the centre which has become good, rich, well rotted compost.
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11 messages