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24/11/2011 at 15:29
I found this very helpful. I will try to do this later on today and I look forward to having the new plants next spring.
14/03/2012 at 16:08
If I take pelargonium cuttings now will I get useable plants for this coming season?
17/04/2012 at 16:00
I would like to know how to take cuttings from my rose leafed geranium which I have as an indoor plant please? Is it the same as for the outdoor pelargoniums?
    17/04/2012 at 17:27

Hello JennB,

Have a go at using this house plant cuttings method. It's very easy to do and has worked well for me.

Emma

gardenersworld.com team

19/04/2012 at 11:51

I'm curious about the bit that says to put the cuttings around the edge of the pot. Why is this? I've also heard (or read - can't remember where) that this doesn't matter any more when using modern pots? Something to do with the materials used to make them.

Can anyone shed any light on this?

19/04/2012 at 13:29

I was always told that the edge of the pot had better drainage, so the cutting is less likely to rot. I believe this is also why old hands prefer terracotta.

19/04/2012 at 14:29

Quite correct Kate. I still do my pelargonium cuttings in terracotta pots.

BTW OH hates the smell of them-oops, several on table in porch & more 'on the go'....J.

20/04/2012 at 11:06

Is there a reason for planting several cuttings in the same pot - apart from space issues is it ok to give each cutting it's own pot so there's no need to re-pot later?

20/04/2012 at 11:15
Solitaire wrote (see)

Is there a reason for planting several cuttings in the same pot - apart from space issues is it ok to give each cutting it's own pot so there's no need to re-pot later?


You can do but the pot needs to be small you dont want a single cutting sitting in a 3 inch pot of damp compost for example the idea of putting lots of cuttings  together is that not all root so it saves on space, compost etc

20/04/2012 at 11:17

Another reason for planting around the edge of a terracotta pot is that roots need some air to thrive. They normally get this as the soil drys out, thus leaving tiny air pockets - another reason why plants need good drainage and not to be over-watered.

20/04/2012 at 11:38

Wow, thanks for the quick replies sotongeoff and Alina, what you say makes sense. I've not tried taking cuttings before so will have a go later in the year.

20/04/2012 at 11:41

Give it a go - it's very rewarding

13/05/2012 at 21:11

These are my favourite plant for the garden.
I have just grown my own this year some from seed and some from plugs, would love to get cuttings for next year.

Very new to gardening so these questions may be a bit basic

"Select healthy, squat and fat shoots. Remove them from the parent plant by cutting immediately above a bud"

Q. What is meant by a bud?

"Remove flower buds and lower leaves from the bottom half of each cutting and cut the stem just below a node"

Q. What is a node?

16/09/2012 at 12:11

16/09/2012 at 14:56
Hi Bud808 think you might be getting things mixed up.
I began this message trying to explain what it all means but it got quite lengthy and difficult to describe without being able to draw a diagram so i have had to give up.
I think the best is for you to get a book on gardening and give yourself time to read and digest the basics of taking cuttings there are many books on the subject.
Please don't stop writing in as there are lots of experianced people here to help.
17/09/2012 at 09:20

I have quite a few double coloured Geraniums that have given me a wonderful display this summer (what little we've had of one that is) so I shall most certainly be giving this a go later on today, Fingers crossed they survive ok in the greenhouse over winter. 

17/09/2012 at 09:26
Joolz wrote (see)

I have quite a few double coloured Geraniums that have given me a wonderful display this summer (what little we've had of one that is) so I shall most certainly be giving this a go later on today, Fingers crossed they survive ok in the greenhouse over winter. 


In an unheated greenhouse they will not survive

17/09/2012 at 09:31

Thanks Sotongeoff, It'll be the hallway for them then! 

17/09/2012 at 14:04
Pelargoniums will.....and do...survive for me in an unheated greenhouse. Often they survive outdoors. But then i am in sw cornwall. The main thing is to keep them fairly dry in the winter only watering during warm spells when it is obvious they need it. Bud808 read up a little to see what buds and nodes are.it really is not difficult. Pelargonium cuttings are best taken and left for day before potting. Cuttings do best on the edge of pot too.
17/09/2012 at 14:13
christopher2 wrote (see)
Pelargoniums will.....and do...survive for me in an unheated greenhouse. Often they survive outdoors. But then i am in sw cornwall. The main thing is to keep them fairly dry in the winter only watering during warm spells when it is obvious they need it. Bud808 read up a little to see what buds and nodes are.it really is not difficult. Pelargonium cuttings are best taken and left for day before potting. Cuttings do best on the edge of pot too.


They may survive for you-you are fortunate in your location-but as a general rule they will not-the damp or cold will see them off-for insurance they are best kept indoors on a sunny windowsill during the winter

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