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AT MY ALLOTMENT (BURNEY LANE BIRMINGHAM) A FAIR FEW PEOPLE HAVE MADE PONDS WITH SPARE SPACE THEY HAVE GOT SO WE CAN ATTRACT BACK THE GREAT CRESTED NEWT IT WAS THERE IN THE 1950,s BUT THE POND GOT FILLED IN MANY MOONS AGO
I would like to encourage hedgehogs into my garden by making a box as I have not seen any for years but understand that they get eaten by badgers which we have .Is this correct
LAST WEEK,I HAD A LOVELY BIG HEDGEHOG IN MY GARDEN,I WENT OUT AND GOT A BOX,HAVE PUT SAWDUST AND SHREDDED PAPER IN IT.FINGERS CROSSED IT WILL NEST,I NORMALLY SEE 2 OR 3 THIS TIME OF YEAR IN MY GARDEN,I GUESS TRYING TO NEST SOMEWHERE. I TO LIKE MICHEAL HAVE PUT A POND IN MY GARDEN,ITS BEEN THERE 4/5YRS NOW,AM TRYING TO GET BACK THE GREAT CRESTED NEWTS..AS MANY YEARS AGO THEY WERE IN OUR AREA,I HAVE ONLY MANAGED TO GET FROGS TOADS AND PALMATE NEWTS. DOES ANYONE KNOW HOW TO ENCOURAGE THE GREAT CRESTED NEWTS BACK INTO MY GARDEN,[ANY SPECIAL PLANTS ETC].
A primary school in Inverness is starting from the 'ground' beginning a vegetable/flower garden. With raised beds and recycled greenhouse. What would be the start to plant? Also on very little budget. Many thanks Isabelle
I found a toad INSIDE an old plastic garden compost bag. I wondered if that was because it was also a haunt of slugs and snails - at least during the day. I could not really put it back but hopefully it found lunch elsewhere.

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I have had a toad for the past 4-5 years. I often disturb it under the courgette leaves. In the cooler weather it sits in my greenhouse. It doesn't appear to have a mate. Is this usual.
Isabelle - well done! Plant potato tubers now in your greenhouse and the children can have new potatoes for Xmas. In your raised beds put onion sets and some of those glorious red, banana shallots. In November, sow some broad beans. Brighten the corners of your beds with Tete -a Tete daffodils. Plant now. Strawberries are a great hit with children so perhaps you could get some runners from one of the parents. Good luck.
Reply to Muriel Your lone toad in the garden is not unusual. You may find it has a mate, or a share of one, if you ever follow it to its home pond for the March mating festival. Often hundreds of toads return to the water body of their birth. Males are so desperate to get hold of a mate that they cling on tightly with special hardened thumb pads. This mating embrace, called amplexus, is to prevent the other males dislodging him. Females can be mobbed and sometimes die because too many males offer their affections.
We have just moved house. The old house had two toads living in the garden (under the shed), the house we have moved to has a much larger very establised garden with pond, which we have now cleared as it was totally overgrown. We have left the pond alone as there are at least 7 frogs in it. My dog has a fixation with the numerous toads (large and small and really tiny) that appear in the evening. He wants to play with them and has licked a couple of them. (Will he eer learn that it is licking toads that cause him to foam at the mouth)
We have tonnes of hedgehogs (or rather my mum thinks we have) in our garden.Does any one know how fast they breed? :-]
I have a frog or is it a toad, I do not know the difference living in my flower pot of mint.he goes off every night at dusk but is back by morning, he is brown with black markings.He has beady eyes and looks at me when I go to check if he is there. could I offer him small worm that I find when I am diging
I have recently been seeing lots (I really mean lots) of miniature frogs in my garden. I do not have a pond at all and wondered where they come from. The adults are about as long as my baby fingernail and the babies are only a quarter of that size! Any ideas?
Mike, I take the mopheads off my plant in Spring. Apparently keeping them on over winter helps the plant. Seems to work with me. Let me know how you get on.
A 1 inch hole with tunnel has appeared in a corner of my lawn near to our pond. Any idea as to what has made it please?

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we have one happily living in our compost heap under the carpet covering it-just makes turning difficult.
Reply to Kathy These miniature froglets must be emerging from a neighbour's pond. They sometimes do this in thousands. Mortality is very high at this vulnerable stage in the frog's life as it moves from aquatic tadpole to terrestrial adult. Eaten by almost anything else, only a few will live the next two or three years to reach sexual maturity and return to mate in the pond.
Reply to George Tunnels in the soil are pretty difficult to identify. You'll have to keep a close watch on it, or even excavate its maker.
I moved a bag of compost that was laying on the grass uncovered Mr Toad he sat for a while then ambled off into the surrounding foliage, hope he picked up some slugs on his way, he is welcome to the moths as well.

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