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11/05/2012 at 09:37

Why doesn't this site's link function work?

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12/05/2012 at 15:49

I lost all my outdoor plants to blight last year, and someone told me I can;t grow toms in that patch for 7 years. Someone else said 5 years and another 3 years! Anyone know which advice I should follow? The link to the rhs site didn;t say either.

12/05/2012 at 15:59
Italophile wrote (see)

Why doesn't this site's link function work?

Cut and paste the links into your browser if you're interested.

To make the links work:

Paste the Link into your message

Highlight it

A link sign will light up above where you are typing immediately to the right of the smiley. Click on it

A box will appear, inviting you to paste your link into it - do so, and click "insert"

The link now works in your message - but don't ask me why it's so complicated!

04/08/2012 at 14:25
I have just had my first attempt at growing anything as we moved to a house with a garden- 30 tomato plants 3 different variety's all healthy and at least 4 foot high then over the space of 4 days the all died- the leaves went brown ,the stems started going brown and the fruit all started to get brown patches then completely covered so today I dug them all up and binned them. MY question is can I grow anything else in the same spot ? I have various chilli and pepper plants next to where the toms where growing and I still have 60 to plant out from the green house- A very gutted Green Monkey :-(
05/08/2012 at 14:19
Alina W wrote (see)
Italophile wrote (see)

Why doesn't this site's link function work?

Cut and paste the links into your browser if you're interested.

To make the links work:

Paste the Link into your message

Highlight it

A link sign will light up above where you are typing immediately to the right of the smiley. Click on it

A box will appear, inviting you to paste your link into it - do so, and click "insert"

The link now works in your message - but don't ask me why it's so complicated!

Thanks for that, Alina. What a weirdly complicated method.

05/08/2012 at 14:27
diggingdoris wrote (see)

I lost all my outdoor plants to blight last year, and someone told me I can;t grow toms in that patch for 7 years. Someone else said 5 years and another 3 years! Anyone know which advice I should follow? The link to the rhs site didn;t say either.

If it was a bona fide Blight - Early Blight, say - you can grow toms in the same spot again the next season. There will likely be fungal spores on the soil surface. Turn the soil over and bury them. I've done it many times. Fungal spores can't do any damage underground. When a new lot arrive next season - and they will, because they're everywhere, you can't avoid them - they will be airborne. They travel on any breeze.

If, on the other hand, you had one of the several tomato virus diseases, you wouldn't want to plant in the same spot again. The viral pathogens can live on in soil.

So if you're sure it was fungal, turn the soil over very well and happily plant away next season.

05/08/2012 at 14:44
Green Monkey wrote (see)
I have just had my first attempt at growing anything as we moved to a house with a garden- 30 tomato plants 3 different variety's all healthy and at least 4 foot high then over the space of 4 days the all died- the leaves went brown ,the stems started going brown and the fruit all started to get brown patches then completely covered so today I dug them all up and binned them. MY question is can I grow anything else in the same spot ? I have various chilli and pepper plants next to where the toms where growing and I still have 60 to plant out from the green house- A very gutted Green Monkey

Sounds ugly, Green Monkey. Condolences. Is this what they looked like?

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/10615.jpg?width=259&height=194&mode=max

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/10616.jpg?width=192&height=262&mode=max

If so, it was Late Blight. It's about the only disease I can think of that will demolish a plant within four days. It's exactly the same disease as Potato Blight.

I'll wait for confirmation - or otherwise - before suggesting action.

12/08/2012 at 19:40

Us too with the blight destroying all our outdoor (have no greenhouse here) tomato plants within days, wonder if you live in South-east UK where it has been warm & humid. Stems look exactly like your picture, Italophile. Advice please?

13/08/2012 at 07:47

Rosemary, Late Blight also manifests on the foliage, resembling dirty brown watersoaked patches. Here's a good example:

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/10770.jpg?width=255&height=300&mode=max

If you're seeing that as well as well as the stem lesions, it's Late Blight. It's terminal, unfortunately. All you can do is remove and destroy the plants.

13/08/2012 at 17:05

Hi I live in Berkshire and have lost most of my tomatoes to the dreaded blight.  Usually I grow seeds from tomatoes ive bought, but this year I bought all new named varieties so thought they would be stronger (just a thought).  Anyway I am so upset as the only plants I have left are two which I left in the greenhouse and one in a hanging basket!

Can anyone tell me if it is safe to use the soil in the tubs that my plants were in and also are there any varieties which are resistant to blight?

Thank you

13/08/2012 at 17:58

Dipadee, I don't know how big your tubs are but it's a good idea to replace the soil (or mix) every year anyway. A season of growing depletes the growing medium of its nutrients and goodness. Starting a new season afresh gives the plants a healthy head start.

There a varieties coming onto the market that are being sold as blight-resistant. That doesn't mean they won't get fungal disease, just that they will - it is claimed - battle on a bit longer when they have it. Honestly, if you spray preventively, or if you don't like spraying and just observe good housekeeping practice at the least, any tomato plant will battle on against fungal disease.

In saying that, I'm talking about the most common fungal problems - Early Blight, Septoria Leaf Spot, etc. Keeping plants well spaced to aid air circulation, removing affected foliage as soon as symptoms appear, keeping the foliage dry and judiciously removing excess foliage to aid air circulation will all help. It takes a very long time for the common fungal problems (above) to kill a tomato plant.

Something like Late Blight, on the other hand, will kill a plant within a week. There's no such thing as resistance to Late Blight.

23/08/2013 at 20:47
Am 58 was used to having a good greenhouse crop of tomatoes .the last 3 years I have had in 2 different greenhouses brown stem tomato blight spreading to the leaves and fruit. Have cleaned the greenhouses disposed of the soil and put in new horse manure with a peat overlay well rotted and moist. good ventilation kept window and doors open all summer.watered early morn and late evening. still stem rot leaves crinkled brown and some fruit discoloured. help me please am at my wits end.
23/08/2013 at 21:28

It's hard to say without seeing them - but at a guess I'd say they've been overwatered.  Even in a greenhouse they shouldn't need watering twice a day - if the soil is permanently damp and the greenhouse is warm you've got the perfect conditions for blight to develop 

Probably too late this year, but next year let the soil dry out until the leaves loose a little turgidity then water well. 

24/08/2013 at 06:35

peter, Dove's right. That's too much water, but it's not going to cause a fungal problem if what you actually have is a fungal problem. It's hard to identify the problem without seeing it. Can you post photos?

04/02/2014 at 13:47

Would spraying with a aspirin mix as a  preventative measure stop blight ??

Clueless

04/02/2014 at 14:16

The aspirin-as-a-treatment-for-fungal-problems theory has been around for a few years. In short, it's based on the notion that one of the constituent parts of aspirin triggers a tomato plant's inbuilt defences against fungal disease. I've never tried it, the few people I know who did try it said it had no noticeable effect. Give it a try, see what happens.

04/02/2014 at 14:29

thank you itlophile

here is the mix anyway

Water your plants with an aspirin?!  Salicylic acid, in aspirin, triggers a defense response in tomatoes and other plants as well! Adapted from eHow:  The main benefit of aspirin in planting involves aspirin’s ability to fend off potential plant diseases.

  1. Purchase regular strength aspirin. The brand does not matter; purchase the cheapest brand that is available.
  2. Mix together one aspirin with one gallon of water. Combine the ingredients well, so that the aspirin is distributed evenly throughout the liquid.
  3. Add a dash of mild liquid soap to the mixture. This is used as a way to help the aspirin water stick better to the tomato plants. Once the soap is added, attach a spray nozzle to the gallon jug and it is ready to use.
  4. Spray the tomatoes when you first set them in the ground. Aspirin sprayed directly on seeds improves germination, on plants it stimulates the growing process. There is no need to soak the area. A light and gentle spray will suffice.
  5. Continue to spray the aspirin mixture on the tomato plants every 2 to 3 weeks. You are going to notice that the plants stay healthier and attract fewer insects.

 

Clueless

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