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23/05/2013 at 15:57

Maybe they planted them upside down bluejan or they could have been that lesser known Australian variety

 

KEF
23/05/2013 at 20:41

bluejan..loved that one

23/05/2013 at 20:53

Bronze Fennel, then went in hospital the week it was seeding. That was in 2008, still digging it out of the border  

23/05/2013 at 22:26

The daftest thing I ever did was to leave a paper bag containing a few daffodil bulbs on the kitchen worktop, knowing that my husband was going to cook our meal that day.

I didn't connect the slight tummy-upset with the meal, as my husband and son had both eaten it, with no ill-effects.  It was only several days later, when I suddenly remembered the bulbs and asked if anyone knew where they had gone to, that the penny dropped.  They had been chopped up instead of the onions. He swears that he didn't check the insurance policy first!

06/06/2013 at 22:11

Thought I would revive this. Must be more silly antics out there.

06/06/2013 at 23:01

Going back to Bee Witched and her football rattle to scare of hares, my grand mother was being kept awake at night by an Owl which came and perched on the wash house chimney  a few feet from her bedroom window. She got so fed up with it that one night she got up, grabbed her corsets and flapped them out of the window at it. I think it got the message!

06/06/2013 at 23:31

I had a friend who died in 1976 (so a long time ago). I knew him as 'Uncle Charlie' but we wern't related. He once told us his wife wasn't much of a gardener but decided to grow some broad beans because she loved them so much. She couldn't understand why none came up at all. When he asked her how she had sown them she said about 2 inches deep. "Did you soak the seeds first?" he asked, "Oh yes," she said, "and I boiled them for 20 minutes before I put them in!"

07/06/2013 at 09:21

Neither of my daughters were natural gardeners at first but over the years both have gradually 'caught the gardening bug' from their mum, and as they got places of their own became very keen.

One of them recently confided in me, however, that some years ago, when standard gardening practices were still very new to her, she wondered why she was not getting any flowers from her planting. She thought, 'I've been deadheading like mum does, why isn't it working?'

The trouble was, she realised eventually, instead of cutting the flower heads off once they were dying off she had been doing it as soon as the poor things first appeared! 

07/06/2013 at 12:36

Introducing the water buttercup (Ranunculus aquatilis) to my small pond ,the pond is long gone but the buttercup lives on and on all over the borders a right pain , i also have the habit of breaking clematis shoots am i heavy handed or is there a right way to tie them in

07/06/2013 at 14:26

See, I knew there would be other daft stories tell.

JH

Pattiuk, I do the same thing with clematis.  Try to be so careful trying to entwine it and the next thing I know I have broken a bit off. 

Birdy, eldest son, many years ago, asked if he could help with the pruning.  Fine, says me, but pointed out one that I wanted left.  Some while later, all plants were about a foot high, including the 'precious' one.  Should have known that one of my offspring would take after me!! Fortunately, they all lived to tell the tale.

07/06/2013 at 19:18

I introduced an ivy into my garden thinking it would hide an unsightly fence and now it is trying to take over my clematis and climbing roses..grrrr Does anyone know how to get ride of ivy?

07/06/2013 at 19:29

My dad decided to cut the hedge while mum was out shopping. Trouble is we didn't have a hedge. It was a shrub border and the philadelphus and Lavatera Barnsley were about to flower. He cut all the flower buds off.

Mum didn't speak to him for three weeks.

07/06/2013 at 19:43

Heavenly S. I had to get rid of ivy a few years back, pull it gently awat from the other plants, chop it ruthlessly right down to the last few leaves and then paint weed killer on those. You may have to do it several times. Eventually it will work.

07/06/2013 at 22:39
fidgetbones wrote (see)

My dad decided to cut the hedge while mum was out shopping. Trouble is we didn't have a hedge. It was a shrub border and the philadelphus and Lavatera Barnsley were about to flower. He cut all the flower buds off.

Mum didn't speak to him for three weeks

Fidgetbones: OUCH! What bothers me is I'm not all sure I've not been pulling up flowers myself  through not recognising them. I have borders full of colour at present - none of which I planted, or can remember planting.

But I CAN remember humming and hahing over all sorts of weedy looking bits lying at ground level a couple of months ago. They turned into all sorts of tall, colourful wonders, including huge poppies that are about to open. 

 

07/06/2013 at 22:48

pattiuk- tie a piece of soft string firmly to the support leaving long enough 'ends' which you can then tie loosely round the stem you're tieing in. Like a figure of eight. 

07/06/2013 at 23:01

Oh wise one FG. That's another good bit of info you have give me tonight. I have no common sense.

07/06/2013 at 23:08

There I was quietly spraying plants,(at a time when I didn't know any better) minding my own business, in a world of my own when I stood on the land drain cover and went down the drain.

3 children heard me yelling and stood in the window killing themselves with laughter. OH joined in the general hilarity, slowly when I didn't move and was crying he realised I had my foot stuck.

A&E visit meant I was on crutches/physio/ no high shoes for months.

Family still bring up the 'hilarious' time I fell down a drain as a good story - hmmmmm!!!

07/06/2013 at 23:19

My mum & dad were very hospitable and our home was an open one. Back in the 1950s we had a number of people who would come and stay for a couple of weeks. One elderly Scottish lady would come down to High Wycombe in Buckinghamshire where we lived each year. Mum & Dad didn't ask for any payment, they were just pleased to help people they knew who couldn't afford a holiday: so 'Aunty Nancy' as we kids knew her (no relation) wanted to do something in return so she found some 'grass seed' and re-sowed some bare patches in the back lawn for dad. They germinated after she had returned home - we had a lawn with various patches of lettuces interspersed. 

08/06/2013 at 09:29

Shouldn't laugh Matty, but I can't help it.  Sounds like when I got stuck in the bath and OH was about to call the fire brigade.

Well, at least they were green JH.

08/06/2013 at 10:55

How weird(John Harding) My aunt came to stay with us for a few weeks and she did exactly the same thing with lettuce seeds instead of grass seed also in the 50`s..We also lived in Wycombe at the time(Terriers)..

John Harding wrote (see)

My mum & dad were very hospitable and our home was an open one. Back in the 1950s we had a number of people who would come and stay for a couple of weeks. One elderly Scottish lady would come down to High Wycombe in Buckinghamshire where we lived each year. Mum & Dad didn't ask for any payment, they were just pleased to help people they knew who couldn't afford a holiday: so 'Aunty Nancy' as we kids knew her (no relation) wanted to do something in return so she found some 'grass seed' and re-sowed some bare patches in the back lawn for dad. They germinated after she had returned home - we had a lawn with various patches of lettuces interspersed. 

 

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