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Bamboogie

The way I think of this is -

P - For the roots

N - For the leaves

K - For the flowers/fruit

simples.

Orchid Lady
Thank you David, very useful info and it explains it a lot better to me now
Orchid Lady
And why haven't you written it Mike.....come on we are waiting PM'd you by the way
Orchid Lady

I'll let you off then Mike  (I was only joking anyway ).  Hope you feel better tomorrow 

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Hey Mike.  Hope your health will be better soon. 

Although I'm "up" on the technical stuff gardening, etc., I think this thread and Mike's PH thread make for a more complete forum for beginners and the rest of us.  

 

chicky

Thanks for this thread - always up for learning the science in bite size chunks !

A question - what does seaweed extract do on the NPK front?  And things like tomato feed are high in K - but do they have any of the N or P too?

Alan4711

HI Dave i found info on seaweed some time ago, i use it for soil improvement and foliar spray and blended as a light feed now and again i also mix it with FBB figs do well on it ,i also dig it in  well in raw. R H S (( Seaweed is rich in trace elements (nutrients that plants only need small amounts of), which are often lacking in common fertilisers such as Growmore and fish, blood & bone, but which are nevertheless important for plant health. However most soils have adequate levels of micronutrients. Nowadays there are a number of dried and processed seaweed available on the market. Some liquid seaweed fertilisers may be applied as foliar feeds, where the nutrients are sprayed onto the foliage and taken up through the leaves.)))  also i use it as i get it for free off the beech, in Wales the allotmenteers leave it on the soil to dry and i think its called calcify and let nature do the work.

Great believer in seaweed.  Think it is the very best soil and plant conditioner.

Used to get loads of fresh seaweed every year....tons of it. ,put on the soil in autumn it deters slugs, improves soil and by spring has rotted down enough to mix into the soil for veg preparation.  Used seaweed spray as a tonic on tomatoes, Beetroot, container plants, etc. etc.

Slightly alkaline so not to be used on ericaceous plants

MrsGarden
Bamboogie wrote (see)

The way I think of this is -

P - For the roots

N - For the leaves

K - For the flowers/fruit

simples.

 

 

          Ah ha, easy to remember - PiNK from the bottom up (pink bottom!).

fidgetbones

Calcified seaweed is not dried seaweed. it is different to seaweed meal. Calcified seaweed is a particular type of algae that extracts calcium from seawater and makes a calcareous type structure. When the algae dies, the calcified bits form deposits on the seabed which is then dredged up. The french call it Maerl and dredge off Brittany. British calcified seaweed  used to be dredged off cornwall, in the mouth of the river Fal. It was stopped because of ecological issues.

I use calcified seaweed instead of lime, when preparing soil for onions or brassicas.

Seaweed meal is usually growing algae that is cut and then washed and dried to make seaweed meal.

Roger  Brook

I used to collect seaweed down on the beach at Seaton Carew when I was a kid sixty years ago. Excellent stuff.

Calcified sea weed is a superb product but It's not right to scrape up the ocean floor causing untold damage just for the garden!

chicky

Love PiNK from the bottom up - might stand half a chance of remembering it now Mrs G you are a genius