London (change)
Today 17°C / 9°C
Tomorrow 15°C / 11°C
21 to 33 of 33 messages
26/03/2013 at 19:32

A seasonal tip for this unseasonable weather, told to me by a nursery man to help avoid frost damage crack the vents open a little on your greenhouse.

Crazy not at all there is science behind it. As air cools it becomes saturated and the water has to condense. To achieve the phase change latent heat has to become real heat and that will slow the temperature drop in the greenhouse. With vents open a little the drier air can escape and be replaced with moist air which repeats the cycle till dawn. Without it the liquid water will become ice and thats what hurts the plants.

 

26/03/2013 at 19:34

Does that apply to greenhouses with a bit of heating as well?

26/03/2013 at 20:06

Figrat I would say no.  with the water vapour condensing being the heat source for the unheated green house the air needs to circulate in and out to get a fresh source of heat. Having a heater inside the greenhouse it would have to work harder to keep heating the cold air entering so you would see no benefit and higher heating bills.  One thing that should help is trying to keep the greenhouse full, So that heat gathered during the day is released slower as the greenhouse cools. 

29/03/2013 at 12:53

Aldi sell lovely little square mini greenhouse propagators, you can find them in the cake aisle labeled Chocolate Gateau once you have discarded the contents you will be left with a mini greenhouse perfect for starting seedlings, with an integral hinged roof which should fit on most windowsills. Goes well with coffee beans or a nice pot of tea. 

29/03/2013 at 12:55
Did someone mention chocolate gateau? I'm in
29/03/2013 at 13:32
blackest wrote (see)

Aldi sell lovely little square mini greenhouse propagators, you can find them in the cake aisle labeled Chocolate Gateau once you have discarded the contents you will be left with a mini greenhouse perfect for starting seedlings, with an integral hinged roof which should fit on most windowsills. Goes well with coffee beans or a nice pot of tea. 

. Actually- the ones you get muffins in in Asda make good little greenhouses too! Verdun- does no one feed you? I'm making a bara brith later.

29/03/2013 at 14:38

Bara brith? I'm in. Are you in Wales, Fairygirl?

P.S. Anyone thought of any ingenious uses for chocolate boxes?

29/03/2013 at 14:52

Here's one some might find useful: Make fine grade vermiculite from standard.

My GC had run out of the fine grade vermiculite I use for covering some seeds, so I tried making my own from standard coarse stuff using a food processor (the type with very rapidily spinning blades, often used to blitz pesto etc.)  Pics below:

http://s3.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/20736.jpg?width=350

 

 

http://s3.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/20737.jpg?width=350

 

 

http://s3.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/20738.jpg?width=350

 

It took just 2 to 3 seconds!

 

29/03/2013 at 17:22

Tip

The fresh fruit pots you can buy with one portion in - Rigid plastic - morrisons and others. Excellent for small pots and if put pot in bottom upturn one and it make s a mini propagator

29/03/2013 at 23:03

Hi ,A tip I got today from a Bee keeper to avoid getting stung don't wear anything "BLUE" they react to this colour it seem's

Derek

03/04/2013 at 16:59

Thankyou Brumball for starting this thread-very usefull

01/06/2013 at 07:40

Only heard this recently: don't use captured water from your butt onto seedlings as this is too acidic apparently?? Use tepid tap water ...

24/06/2013 at 17:18

The adhesive copper tape that is available to stick around the rims of pots in order to deter slugs and snails can also be formed into rings which can be popped around the stems of vulnerable plants.  You can cut the tape in half, it works just as well and is more economical.  Cut a strip about 6 inches long, peel off the backing paper  about an inch at one end and stick down to form a ring.  It has worked so far for me this year!

email image
21 to 33 of 33 messages