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20/04/2013 at 17:46

Been oop t'lotty this afternoon, and planted out a row of reasonable broad beansies, then prepared the new strawberry bed that produced a record crop of 4 strawberries last year ! Sowed 4 doz wigwam beans into potties, fed the wild birds with meal worms, blackies getting very tame this year, chattered to the gang of spuggies in the hedge, drowning  out the Dunnocks , and had a generally nice relaxing time. 

This is what it's all about............ relaxing. Gardening ain't fun if yer 1/2 killing yerself over a mere plot of soil. 

22/04/2013 at 20:25

Fairygirl wrote (see)

Cilmeri I just saw you post on here about 'views'. It's called a borrowed view (self explanatory) and yes, you can create it in your own garden by cutting gaps in hedges or fences etc to glimpse the view beyond. It's most effective if your own garden is fairly enclosed and it then looks like the bit you see through the 'hole' is another part of your own plot. It's a lovely thing to do if you can-the Italians are very good at it and the 'landscape' designers here hundreds of years ago.

Thank you Fairygirl, just picked this up.

My garden is very enclosed. Realise that a trellised gap in the long fence would bring the hills beyond into view  but still give some privacy from the (public) riverside walk outside. Considered a mirror in the fence but it would only reflect the house.

22/04/2013 at 20:42

Hello, Busy-Lizzie, your photograph of the woodland garden at Sissinghurst is lovely, those blues!  and I like the way your lawn curves away to draw the eye to the trees. Oh, that my garden had such depth (sigh).

Thank you for sharing bith phos with us.

22/04/2013 at 21:02

Your garden looks stunning Busy Lizzie. Looking forward to seeing more pics through the summer. And everyone elses gardens

22/04/2013 at 22:35

Got a 10X10 patch covered with a camping ground sheet, and another 14X14 carpeted . Only the best Qilton or Axminster will do !

 

The birds have got used to me and t'missus sitting out on the bench throwing meal worms down to them, and Madam Blackbird comes in reet close now. It's getting better all the time. I love this time of the year. Things are coming to life again, after the 6 month winter !  Bloomin' 'eck, it'll be autumn before we know it !  Can we get by on a 6 qweek growing season ?

22/04/2013 at 22:46

Cilmeri-you can angle the mirror so that you can get the view you want. Probably need an extra pair of hands so that you can determine it.

Left a bit ..right a bit..up...stop...

23/04/2013 at 07:30

 thanks Fairygirl, will try that.Have a shrubberyto one side of the gardenby the neighbours fence, not too difficult to get at so that may the place

23/04/2013 at 07:36

I think the only prob is preventing birds flying into it but if you position it the right way it should be ok . Slightly hidden is the answer I think. Or some planting carefully 'draped' so that birds would be going slower towards it anyway. 

You can buy garden mirrors which are acrylic but they're pretty expensive I think.

23/04/2013 at 08:38

Birds don't usually fly into mirrors unless they feel agressive, eg mating season. As they approach the mirror they see themselves and think it is another bird. It's not like windows when the glass is clear.

23/04/2013 at 08:47
I created a couple of "framed" views for a friend. She has a view of St Michaels Mount and the bay at Penzance
A view between a cherry and a silver birch shows the distant sea and bay. The
white branches below blue sky....nice
A similar view of the Mount allowed by judicial pruning and shaping too
Never been very good at using mirrors in the garden..never quite managed to make them look natural. The best is prob near my greenhouse where I have a solar lamp on a cane and a mirror behind. The reflection echoes around the greenhouse and, at moment, shows up a white camellia there.
Best "reflection" is prob a white dierama near my small pool....the inverted foliage and flowers look quite natural. Need much bigger pool though to achieve what I really want
23/04/2013 at 09:07

That sounds lovely Verdun. Both what you did for your friend and your own garden.

I hadn't thought of using a mirror in my garden but I think it may be a good idea.

23/04/2013 at 09:39

Me Missus and I were on St Michaels mount t'other day. It was surreal and beautiful. The tide was in and we took the boat across, (obviously ), The sky was a peerless blue,  sun shining fit to burst, and we nearly froze our nadgers off ! For once, it was warmer insde than out !  But on the whole, the Bay is  great view to encounter when returning after too long away.  I still have me we cottage down inSt.Just, and on a stormy day, you can hear the boulders rolling on Porthnanven beach, a mile inlad from it !

23/04/2013 at 11:45

Fairygirl, I bought some acrylic mirror type tiles in Ikea for a very small price, they ae slightly faceted so the birds avoid them (no, I don't understand it, but it is so) and they give wonderful broken light effect patches where it is normally dark.  Come t think of it, I must get them out of the shed and hang them up - I put them away when it is very cold as I suspect that they are not very hardy, just a coating of silver paint on plastic, but they are great draped in various growth !!  

24/04/2013 at 09:46
Just back from a few days in Cornwall, visiting Pentillie Castle last Saturday, and getting my 15 seconds of fame when I was interviewed by ITV News West Country!
Spent yesterday evening at the allotment planting cauliflower and calabrese plants which have outgrown the GH - nice and relaxing job, and pleasant too, as temperatures yesterday were 70 or more. Can't decide which is best, at the allotment in lovely warm weather, or back in Cornwall? Probably the latter!
25/04/2013 at 05:19
Fairygirl wrote (see)

I think the only prob is preventing birds flying into it but if you position it the right way it should be ok . Slightly hidden is the answer I think. Or some planting carefully 'draped' so that birds would be going slower towards it anyway. 

You can buy garden mirrors which are acrylic but they're pretty expensive I think.

Fairygirl wrote (see)

I think the only prob is preventing birds flying into it but if you position it the right way it should be ok . Slightly hidden is the answer I think. Or some planting carefully 'draped' so that birds would be going slower towards it anyway. 

You can buy garden mirrors which are acrylic but they're pretty expensive I think.

 

Bookertoo wrote (see)

Fairygirl, I bought some acrylic mirror type tiles in Ikea for a very small price, they ae slightly faceted so the birds avoid them (no, I don't understand it, but it is so) and they give wonderful broken light effect patches where it is normally dark.  Come t think of it, I must get them out of the shed and hang them up - I put them away when it is very cold as I suspect that they are not very hardy, just a coating of silver paint on plastic, but they are great draped in various growth !!  

 Thank you both for this information  A day in the garden today so will be trying to visualise the reflected angles. Things are taking shape, I'm a happy gardener!

25/04/2013 at 07:13

What a lovely thread! I haven't found it until now.

I have some acrylic mirrors in the garden framed with driftwood that I bought in a craft show in Dorset. They were under £20 each. The reflection is not as natural as glass, though. There's  nothing exciting to reflect in this small garden except greenery and, sadly, absolutely no vistas, but they do allow the eye to travel a bit further and help soften the boundaries. The best we could manage for vistas was to reclaim the bit if land that held the greenhouse, which is longer than the rest of the garden, and put a bench at the end of it and a curved path leading to the bench. I have started to plant the borders around the path. A large clematis planted last year will, I hope, start to grow over an arch to help hide the houses behind without stealing too much of their light. That thought makes me happy!

25/04/2013 at 09:24

Happiness is relative, and after you have been stung by a much loved bee that seemed to go banzai when I sat down on our garden bench, it dive bombed me, set to at my nose, got straight in on my arm, and gave me a most irritating injection of venom.  Perhaps a bad day at the hive ........?  There mus be easier ways of relieving Rheumatizz than being walloped by a bee !

 

KEF
25/04/2013 at 09:46

I'm new to the forum, but just wanted to say how lovely Busy-Lizzie's garden looks. I'm happy as all my cucumbers have germinated..in the dining room. The conservatory has potted on tomatoes & chillies. The greenhouse doing well, beans & peas germinated,lettuce showing...sprouting broc' germinated looking forward to some wonderful veg & salads. Got to put up my wigwams & sew the spinach today. Maybe some more radishes.

Hope the weather is kind and you all have a good gardening day.

25/04/2013 at 10:03

busy lizzie.. i went to sissinghurst back at easter.. as was dissapointed.. most of the gardens were fenced off.. the spring garden.. the only one in flower was closed.. and the only things up were heelebores and primroses.. thou it was cold.. it was not happy paying full price for the gardens  when we couldnt go round have of them.

i am happy now spring is here.. my fav time of the year in the garden.. have sown lots of summer annuals and veg in last few weeks and they are all shooting up with this warmth.. and i love it. only problem now is i have to prick them all out and pout up.. i use the paper pots i make with the wooden pot maker i got for xmas last year from my little lad.. they are great pots.. as thye break down so you can transplant without breaking any roots.

the tuplips are now opening up and the wood pigeons are nesting in my large verbnium bush right my office window.. so can check them out from inside wihtout bothering them.

the gardens i just coming alive with the warm sunshine of late.

25/04/2013 at 10:15

Welcome KEF, hope all your veg do well

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