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8 messages
02/08/2014 at 16:04

Hi

I have a tomato plant growing sadly I don't know what it is but all the tomatoes it produces are heart shaped !...I really would like to know if it is possible to save seed or something in order to reproduce it next year???? is it possible?

02/08/2014 at 16:20
Hi debbie, im sure i saw a variety of tomato which is heart shaped, it must be what you have, yes you should be able to propogate from seed, squish your chosen tomato through a sieve, you might need to rince the yuky bits off, leave to completely dry, then store in a paper bag
Im sure i saw this in this months gardeners world mag, might be worth a look

Good luck
02/08/2014 at 16:46

Hi Debbie, As long as the tomato plant isn't a hybrid, saved seeds should come true if you didn't grow other varieties close by.  If it was an F1 variety, that won't be the case but some of the plants grown from saved seed may be similar.  Have a look at the realseeds site below which encourages you to save seed.  Look at the panel on the left under 'Seedsaving' for lots of great tips:

http://www.realseeds.co.uk/

 

02/08/2014 at 16:47

Debbie........if it is an F1 variety, it won't necessarily come true from seed you collect.

Worth a try if you don't know the variety but be prepared for a disappointment.  Best to check it out and see if you can determine which it is that you are currently growing

02/08/2014 at 17:11

There are several heirloom tomatoes producing heart-shaped fruits, including the Pink Oxheart and Anna Russian.  

I grew Anna Russian last year - a fabulous tomato  http://tatianastomatobase.com/wiki/Anna_Russian  

02/08/2014 at 18:48

I've been putting seeds onto a piece of kitchen roll and the cutting around them. Do you think that'll be okay as a method of saving tomato seeds?

02/08/2014 at 18:53

They're pretty robust Clarington.  The realseeds site recommends fermenting them to get rid of the gluey bit around the seed to make them easier to handle.  The less tomato material left stuck to them the less likely they will rot.  I have dozens of them appear all over my garden from those damaged ones I throw into the compost heap, so they certainly don't need mollycoddling!

Lyn
02/08/2014 at 19:21

A lot of sites do a lot of faffing about, all I did was hooked them out washed them off dried them on kitchen paper and as it was March, put them straight in a pot, 

For next year, just leave them on the window sill to dry and store in a paper envelope. Everything simple and easy for me.

I sowed 4 and they all germinated, they are lovely little cherry ones, straight from the supermarket.

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