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31/10/2013 at 14:10
what does that comment refer to Farmergeddun?
31/10/2013 at 14:17

Yes pg - you're right! Us womenfolk have to multi task - while men just talk about it 

Verdun - you can't get round me that easily! 

My grandpa liked his gardening - think that might be where I get it from.  I don't have anything of his- just his work ethic perhaps 

31/10/2013 at 14:20
I agree with you potty, well done.
KEF
31/10/2013 at 14:40

It's in a sad state, I don't use it, don't know what it's for, maybe earthing up spuds. I'm told my Grandfather who was a blacksmith made it so I rescued from M's and now in my shed. I was going to take a photo of the inside of the shed but I can barely get in.

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/33410.jpg?width=201&height=350&mode=max

 

31/10/2013 at 15:03
i always thought that it was a scarifier i remember using the at school in rural studies we used it to weed in between row's
31/10/2013 at 15:05

This thread has reawoken memories I had long since forgotten. My grandfather used to have a wooden framed glass greenhouse that spanned half the length of the garden. It was painted a deep orange red and he'd dug half a paving slabs depth into the ground for extra space. I don't think it ever had a door on it, part of me wonders whether that had long rotted away as it was in a very poor state with quite a lean to it (I remember being VERY nervous after he died when we pulled it down expecting it to snap and shatter glass at any second!). Every time I smell tomatoes growing I always think of him and now I remember why!! He would always have tomatoes in grow bags just by the enterance during the summer and at the far end a collection of pots / HUGE spiders that would have your arm off / "useful things" / that I was always told to stay away from.

He had a stone raised bed in the middle of the garden, I really have no idea what he grew in there although there must have been *something* aside from a few daffs. I remember it being my job to scrub the bird bath out every week as grandma didn't like the green alge that made it look untidy. I'll bet it was the cleanest bird bath for miles.

His shed was a typical granddads shed. Full of glass jars of nails, oil rags, and suspisous chemicals that were no doubt at one time commonly used in gardens where as now we'd recoil in horror and all in an almighty mess as it was the one area grandma didn't visit and so wasn't kept mecticulously clean. The cat was besotted with him and you'd often find him in his shed with the cat perched on the workbench helpfully knocking over the chess pieces that he was trying to make or looking in utter disgust at the dust and wood chips getting in her fur yet refusing to leave his side.

The only real plant (aside from tomatoes) I can remember him growing was geraniums in pots. There were EVERYWHERE. They'd be scattered all over the conservatory, hanging off the rafters at the front of the house, and in baskets in the back garden. I'm sure he must have grown other plants but all I can think of is those huge brightly colours geraniums mainly red getting in the way of the assult course I was trying to make with my bike. Ungrateful bugger!!

31/10/2013 at 15:14
cheers brum, having problems pasting photos for some reason i have searched many pics out but it wont let me post them.any suggestions.i wrote to daniel but got no reply from him
31/10/2013 at 15:25
no mate its this site i cant even add any smileys either to any messages
31/10/2013 at 15:27
i also find it hard to contact anyone on here like the technical team,
KEF
31/10/2013 at 16:11
KEF wrote (see)

It's in a sad state, I don't use it, don't know what it's for, maybe earthing up spuds. I'm told my Grandfather who was a blacksmith made it so I rescued from M's and now in my shed. I was going to take a photo of the inside of the shed but I can barely get in.

http://s3.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/33410.jpg?width=350


 

http://s3.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/33436.jpg?width=350

 Picture will enlarge, something to work the soil I think. Found a photo of a better angle.

31/10/2013 at 17:05

Ahh .... Claringdon, what memories. Sadly my grandads both died when I was young but my Dad made up for it with his shed. What springs to mind among all the wierd and wonderful dusty, cobwebby stuff he surrounded himself with, is a couple of little stream driven engine thingamybobs that ran on Methalated spririts.  I remember painting the outside to look like a black and white beamed cottage and the veggie patch outside. He's moved house about 3 times since then and still has a muddley, dusty shed and a veg patch, minus the engines, must find out what happended to them! (cats and spiders are pre requisits!)

31/10/2013 at 19:05

Fairy....you gotta be friendly.  I'm just a simple Cornish guy with a straw hanging  out of his mouth.  Dont know if I'm comin or goin   Don't know my dandelion  from my taraxicum........

KEF
31/10/2013 at 19:41

I would be pleased if anyone could tell me what the 'weapon' is that I posted pics of.   I know it was made before 1960 and it was made for and used by my Dad but he only had an allotment, not a flower garden. It is heavy and large, that's why I've taken a picture on bricks to indicate size. I think that if it was cleaned up it would be sharp, diamond shaped prongs. To me it looks like something you'd plow with  

31/10/2013 at 20:17

KEF, isn't it a cultivator?  I'm sure I've seen this tool before.  If I had it I would use it for tilling the ground 

 

31/10/2013 at 20:49

Verd. beat me to it...it's a cultivator... a way of digging without digging if you get my drift....

31/10/2013 at 20:50

It would be particularly useful on raised beds with a no-dig regime.

KEF
01/11/2013 at 07:21

Thank you all. I had forgotten about it until I read this thread. I'm going to clean it up and use it.

01/11/2013 at 07:53

Yes a cultivator - we had one for the veg patch when I was a child 

01/11/2013 at 09:00
ginagibbs wrote (see)

Ahh .... Claringdon, what memories. Sadly my grandads both died when I was young but my Dad made up for it with his shed. What springs to mind among all the wierd and wonderful dusty, cobwebby stuff he surrounded himself with, is a couple of little stream driven engine thingamybobs that ran on Methalated spririts.  I remember painting the outside to look like a black and white beamed cottage and the veggie patch outside. He's moved house about 3 times since then and still has a muddley, dusty shed and a veg patch, minus the engines, must find out what happended to them! (cats and spiders are pre requisits!)

I think a man and his shed should be a staple part of any childs growing up! Certainly I feel pity for my friends children who are going to grow up with fathers who lack in a man space and can't change a plug (or don't even own a tool set - I gave my brother his first tool set when he was 25!) Better still is when they're full of really dangerous tools and machines to give you a good education in respect, how to handle sharp things, and life in general! My fathers workshop is something else. Its mixed with 40% envy, 40% respect 20% fear for your life.

Te
01/11/2013 at 09:06
my grandad wont let nobody in his shed haha my nan sez he can liv on ther to giv her piece an quite haha
Te
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