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04/08/2014 at 06:24

On this 100th anniversary day of the outbreak of WW1, I'll be remembering my dear old Dad, who enlisted into the army at the age of 16 (lied about his age, as many did)  returning home broken, scarred, both mentally & physically.

RIP, Dad. 

We will remember them.

04/08/2014 at 06:36
Best wishes David x

Hugely proud and honoured to have had these people fight for us x
KEF
04/08/2014 at 06:56

Good thread David. x

04/08/2014 at 07:28

I shall be thinking of the grandfather and uncle I never knew - they returned but so damaged mentally and physically.

I shall also be reflecting, as I frequently do these days, on why countries are so rarely led by people who understand how to live peaceably. 

04/08/2014 at 07:37

Best wishes David.x

Thinking of them all.

04/08/2014 at 07:44

We must never forget David.

A big hug to you today, and everyone else who lost someone special. x

I'm lucky, my grandpa was relatively unscathed. 

04/08/2014 at 07:57

Hugs are always welcome, so thanks for them....but I did nothing. I do however feel privileged to be the son of one of those millions of heroes who went through so much for us all.  

04/08/2014 at 08:01

A reflection from the Eden Project....of the 12 gardeners who enlisted for service  in WW1, just 3 returned. This gives some idea of the scale & magnitude of the loss of young life.

Lyn
04/08/2014 at 08:56

David you mean the lost gardens of Heligan. The garden is now beautifully restored to its former glory.

04/08/2014 at 09:01
Lyn wrote (see)

David you mean the lost gardens of Heligan. The garden is now beautifully restored to its former glory.

 

Yes, Lyn...I think you're probably right. I picked-up on it during a recent TV program.

04/08/2014 at 09:08

Thanks for this thread David.

04/08/2014 at 09:27

My great grandfather went missing in action in the Somme in July 16. His name is on the Thiepval memorial.

I'll pilgramage over to France to commemorate that anniversary as I am aware of where he was fighting on the day and I'll try and take my nephew.

04/08/2014 at 09:28

One grandfather was totally deaf, so never fought. The other was a missionary in India, joined an Indian company and went with them to Palestine as military chaplain. He followed them to Turkey and then to France. There must be thousands and thousands of people in India who are thinking the same thoughts today.

04/08/2014 at 10:00

I did not know either of my grandfathers as a result of WW1, so on this beautiful day I shall spend a little time thinking of them, and wondering what they were like.

04/08/2014 at 10:17

My Memory is of two great Uncles who came back, one badly gassed and one with horrendous wounds, the hospitals discharged them as they wanted the beds and all the women in the family had to dress the wounds and look after them, my Mother bore the dread of wounds into my time. One died 1925 the other 1933 short and bitter lives for all involved. My memories come from the women of the family who had the job of nursing them. I also remember Uncle Frank killed on the hood, Uncle Ron who went through six years of war and never spoke of it. Some of the young often badly trained youths of my time sent into war zones that were called Local action zones so it sounded less aggressive by politicians who meddle in other peoples lives and bring nothing but chaos and misery.

Those memories are always there David though a special date will bring them to the fore, those of us who came back will always see the very young faces of those who did not.

Frank.

04/08/2014 at 10:52
Am a little too young to have any reletives touched by WW1, just been watching the service on BBC1, very touching, brings home just how terrible things were,how very brave and tough the soldiers and their families were.

Thank you for posting your stories, im embarassed to say, i didnt know very much about this war, my thoughts are with those of you who lost someone x
04/08/2014 at 11:43

My thoughts are with everyone touched by all wars past and present.

04/08/2014 at 11:50

The Society of Friends, the Quakers, are standing in Bakewell town centre, silently expressing a desire for peace in the world. If only more people were silent there would be fewer conflicts, I think.

Sorry to be a complete ignoramus, but can anyone tell me exactly the process that took us from a Serb nationalist shooting Franz Josef to total mayhem involving the death of unconnected people in almost every nation on earth?

 

04/08/2014 at 12:21
Its very sad Pansyface, even moreso that "we" keep repeating the same things in the world, loss of life and suffering over and over. Will try to appreciate the good things, those of us here and now are very fortunate
04/08/2014 at 12:54

Pansyface, simple 1) Austrian Empire rules the Balkans badly. 2) Balkan separatists decide it must end. 3) Austria declares war on Serbia. 4) Russia comes in on Serbia's side. 5) Germany comes to Austria's aid. Russia has a pact with France. 6) Germany decides to knock out France with one blow invading through Belgium. 7) Britain has pact with low countries and declares war on 4th August 1914.

One unconnected fact has a domino effect on Europe which ended in 18,000,000 killed world wide. Our politicians have this idea that a good war will enhance their status, the very young men and women who fight those political wars have a word for those people not printable here and I still use it.

Frank.

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