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12 messages
25/11/2013 at 14:30

I would say that I live in a microclimate as I live near the coast, my garden is south facing and sheltered. The top half of my garden rarely gets any frost (though the area where my GH is does and quite often). It is often a good few C warmer than the weather forecasts say at the top of my garden nearest the house (lots of sunny brick walls to retain heat). In winter I can see the frost/snow less than a mile or so away on either side and smile that it is not me .

The problem with microclimates is everyone seems to think that they are in one! Every other gardener says that their garden is not as cold as X Y miles away and etc...surely we cannot all have a microclimate? This is not just a UK thing, I know gardeners all over the EU and US that say the same thing - and quite adamant of it.


What do you think?

 

I think microclimates only make a difference in 'normal weather' . There is very little difference when weather like 2010 happens as when it gets to -5C and below or we have heavy snow, then we all get damage, though it may fade faster is 'microclimates'

25/11/2013 at 14:37

My garden is in open countryside with no shelter except what I've planted.  The land rises a few metres behind us to the north side so frost rolls down from the fields against the back of the house.  I once had -32C in this frost pocket and - 25C on the warmer south facing front of the house.  That's colder than the Ardennes and a good 5 or 6 degrees colder than the town just 3kms to the west.

Definitely a micro climate with its own wee pockets of extremes.

25/11/2013 at 18:07

I think most gardens have a mini micro climate.....mine certainly has.  Areas where some plants will thrive yet struggle just a few metres elsewhere.  

It's all relative though.  Here the climate is milder than even 5 miles further east.  Mainly because the north coast is prob less than 10 miles from the south coast so a big sea warming influence in winter.  Cooling too in summer.  However, 5 miles further west is a degree or so milder again.  Then the Scillies are milder still.  

Last winter, for example, was mild here. A few miles east and it was all change.  Most of,the country suffered from pretty cold conditions but here it was wet.  Mild but wet.  Who knows what this winter will bring?

I think micro climates do make a difference.  It's usually a matter of a few degrees.....however, 2 degrees is very different to -2 degrees..  Freezing or not; snow or rain.  

 

25/11/2013 at 18:37

Yes, all gardens have their own microclimate unless they are identical in all respects to the one next door.  Simply having a fence or hedge in a different place (eg West rather than East facing) will create conditions (eg shelter from prevailing wind) different enough that the same plant may survive in one but not in the other.

25/11/2013 at 19:00

I don't have a single microclimate, I have several.

26/11/2013 at 10:40

Me too.  I can grow a golden sambucus in one spot but not further along where there's more wind exposure so mum has died but daughter is thriving.   The house has garden on all four sides and each has very different exposure to sun, wind, rain and frost as well as different drainage and soil conditions which make a huge difefernce to what can be grown well and what will struggle..

 

26/11/2013 at 10:52

Hi all, first post.

Living in the lee of the South Downs in a heavily wooded environment, the whole areas a micro climate. Even in the heaviest of frosts we never get more than a degree or so and winds at their worse very light.

House sits east to west so sun streams through the bedroom windows first thing all year round,the Acer in the front garden loves the afternoon and evening sun and the apples and plums in the back garden flourish as a result of day long sunshine.

26/11/2013 at 11:38

Welcome stevie

Your garden aspect sounds perfect. 

26/11/2013 at 11:44

Welcome stevieb 

That sounds idyllic - our garden sits east to west like yours - I'm currently planning a border for the front (at present just lawn) and amongst other plants I'm choosing some that will look fabulous from our sitting room with the low evening sun shining through them.  (It'll make life a bit tricky for the window cleaner tho' ).

Looking forward to hearing more about your garden   Bet you get plenty of wildlife too. 

26/11/2013 at 12:27

Yes we do, especially birds, since we've lived here I've identified over 40 different species including 3 of the 4 woodpeckers, various hawks and owls and virtually every finch and tit.

On the horticultural front as we've very sandy soil I've often threatened to plant some black currants which I think I may get round to in the next week or so.

26/11/2013 at 20:59

Hiya stevieb15 and welcome to the forum 

Re your blackcurrants.  Don't forget...sure you know anyway...they are greedy feeders so plenty of compost, manure and fertiliser. 

28/11/2013 at 10:59

There is a huge woodland near my house and a public park yet I rarely get birds apart from Wood Pigeons, Gulls and Magpies in my garden. The odd Robin and Lapwing and during the darks of winter Partridge and that is all that I have seen in 3 years. My old flat had a huge garden and we used to get flocks of Sparrows and the like...I do get Toads and Frogs in summer but that is it wildlife wise.

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