Start a new thread

1 to 10 of 10 replies

LittleMissSunshine

Getting an aerator/scarifier has been on my list of things to do for a while, with a heavy clay soil and a few weed and moss patches that appear over winter I was hoping this would help with lawn strength. 

Also what are your thoughts on lawn mulch... yay or nay?

Many thanks,

LMS. 

Last edited: 09 August 2017 16:00:35

LittleMissSunshine

Hmm ok perhaps not... I might go for a qualcast not seen poor reviews, fairly inexpensive and an brand I know (well did).

Do you all do this by hand or not bother?

Mike Allen

Interesting question.  Forgive me please, but I speak as a profesional.  No.  No boasting.  Our friend asks a question I assume relates to the garden lawn, grass area.  Obviously the methods are greatly diverse, garden lawn and sports field.

Today the average gardener is blessed or burdened by so many choices. Rotorvators, spikers  rakes etc.  You name it and it's there.  Once again.  you pays your money  and you take your chance.. To scarify and areate the average lawn.  Forget the eletroninic and mechanics..  Trust me.  A simple multi spiked lawn rake and a garden fork, the latter,  a hollow tined fork.   The latter when applied penetrates the soil and upon withdrawal extracts a core of soil.  This aids the follow-up of treating the lawn with sharp sand.  This in turn is gently brushed into the soil.  Result.  Improved ventilation and drainage.  The scarifying.  Mechanically.this is inteneded for larger areas.  Back to the garden lawn.  A wire lawn rake is best.  Working backwards gently rake the area.  When a mass of thatch gfathers.  Stop,remove and carry on.  The objective here is to renove the dead grass the mowing clippings to open up the weave of the grass carpet.  Please.  Forget the electo/mecanical aids.  Do it by hand.  Trust me.

Wilkos has a good aerator for about 8 quid. I don't use mine though because it takes a bit of strength to put it into the soil and at 4' 10" even jumping on it doesn't do much. Garden fork is easier in this case.

It depends how big your lawn is and how strong you are in my opinion. I'm to old and decrepit and my lawn is too big to do by hand so I've bought an in inexpensive electric one and an extension lead. I've yet to use it in anger though but I hope it will help me to get rid of the moss and dead grass.

Last edited: 13 August 2017 08:27:46

Advertisement

Dovefromabove

For those of us with bad shoulders, knees etc we have two options ... we can either get a professional to come along and do it for us, or we can buy a machine.

I bought one of these last year ... I've found it very effective and straightforward to use.  I've recommended it to others who've said the same.

http://www.screwfix.com/p/titan-ttb428gdo-32cm-1300w-lawn-scarifier-230v/48162 

When I bought it it was in a sale at half price so it's worth shopping around.

LittleMissSunshine
Dovefromabove says:

For those of us with bad shoulders, knees etc we have two options ... we can either get a professional to come along and do it for us, or we can buy a machine.

I bought one of these last year ... I've found it very effective and straightforward to use.  I've recommended it to others who've said the same.

http://www.screwfix.com/p/titan-ttb428gdo-32cm-1300w-lawn-scarifier-230v/48162 

When I bought it it was in a sale at half price so it's worth shopping around.

Oh thank you, I will give it a go since the lawn is to large and me not so large thus I need assistance, I have paid for someone to do it in the past but figured to do it myself would be more cost effective if it lasts more than 2 seasons, and as this is guaranteed for 2 years it would be good, although it isn't an aerator so maybe I look for a Titan 2 in 1 to deal with the heavy clay soil that compacts very easily .
See original post

 

Mike Allen

"Old and decrepid.  Bad shoulders, knees etc."  Hi there.  At last I have found fellow sufferers.  Old and decrpid...that's me 77 and I can't rearrange the numbers.  Yes.  I also have my fair share of disabilities.

Now back to the original.  Fair do's I have worked with commercial parks machinary.  Now in your garden.  Depending of course on the size of your lawn.  Manual spiking and scarifying, every time.  Scarifying.  A basic lawn rake will do. The idea is to remove the thatch from the grass.  Then the aeation.  A common garden fork will do, but a hollow tined fork is better.  The latter will take out cores of soil.  This will enable sharp and to be brushed across the lawn, the sand sinking and filling the holes.  This will allow free drainage and sub-soil ventilation.

Marketwise.  This spiker will rejuvinate your lawn.  RUBBISH. Garden macinary on offer to the public is mere gimmicary.  Spikers, rotovators etc.  The machine lacks weight.  A rotorvator simply rough up what? three to four inches of soil surface.  Manually a spade or fork will turn over 12 inches of soil.

In pactice. Set a line say three to four feet wide.  Now working backwards, either rake..scarify or aereate.  Then measure a further area.  In comparison youy will find the manual method best.

Lyn

We bought this one in April 2013, it has raked our lawn for five years, twice a year, so not bad for a three quarter acre lawn, it will do the whole lot in one go, no overheating. The first time we used it it there was enough moss to fill a small caravan. 

I would say don't buy anything less than 1300w, but this has served us well, if it didn't work next year I would still be pleased with it.  I find it's no good putting the box on it though, well not for our caravan full! 

This one is unobtainable but I suppose there is similar if you look around. 

You cant imagine how a lawn rakes pulls on a bad back.😱😀

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00142IQIG/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 

I've got an electric scarifier but tend now to use a rake, as it's a bit of exercise, I'm relatively undecrepit(!) though and my lawn is small (30sqm?). I bought the Wilko hollow-tine aerator but have ended up hammering it in with a mallet on a test section as my soil's so compacted / dry, so the jury's out on that one until I try later on this year when there's a bit more rain. I can't see how a garden fork would work, as the soil's got to go somewhere, so you're alleviating compaction by creating compaction elsewhere, whereas a hollow-tine aerator actually removes plugs of soil. Equally, I can't see how refilling those lovely new holes with sand (the usual advice) works as you'll then have gone from compaction to a sandier version of compaction. The usual advice with moss is not to grow grass there I think, as it suggests an area too dark / wet for grass to do well. Mulching - can't say I've given that one much thought: as far as I understand it, it's a way of avoidjng picking grass clippings up isn't it(!). There are granular / soluble feeds which are likely to feed the grass better and I imagine that leaving clippings on the grass can only add to the effects of thatch and risk filling in your lovely hollow-tined holes! Good luck!

Sign up or log in to post a reply