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10 messages
12/05/2014 at 12:31

I am a florist and have rabbits so most of that goes into the compost my problem is that my compost bin is always full. I was wondering if there was a way of getting it down quicker?

I have been looking at hot compost bins ( but seen flaws in the design) and also wormeries.

I would also like to start to compost my home waste such as left over dinners ( lamb diners etc)

I have been scouring the internet on what i can use but am really stuck and would really appreciate some advice.

thank you

12/05/2014 at 12:50

If the bin is big enough (a metre cube) and has the right mixture of stuff in it it should heat up and, after turning a couple of times, be ready in a few months in the summer at least.  Or are you using a dalek-sized plastic one?  If so, the prob might just be that it ain't big enough.  Maybe a second one; turn the compost into that when the first one's full?

Ooh - and don't risk putting cooked food in, especially meat, as it'll attract rats etc.  Uncooked veg waste from the kitchen in fine, mixed well with grass cuttings, old flowers, ex-plants. weeds, rabbit poo, shredded paper/card etc.

12/05/2014 at 12:58

thanx steve309.

i have got a normal black platic bin that we had off the council. i don't think it's heating yp tho - maybe thast's the problem. will look into how to get it t heat up thanx.

12/05/2014 at 12:59

It needs to be big, Amme!  And/or insulated.

12/05/2014 at 13:12

Have you a gentleman in your life who wouldn't mind peeing into the compost bin (or into a jug at least) to help break things down?

12/05/2014 at 14:11
It would be a good idea to get two bins so that you can have one rotting down while you fill the second one (I have three bins). I have found a selection of wildlife helps make the compost.......worms, mice, ants, flies.
12/05/2014 at 14:37

Amme, Compost needs three things, a good mix of stuff, Air, Heat Dampness not wet. OK four things then A bin size will not be big enough to get the heat needed over a short period so you are looking at months before compost is made.

The ideal is two large containers one to fill one to use, a good mix would be green stuff woody stuff vegetable peelings paper straw grass cuttings although only a thin layer of that, also the odd pot gets emptied into it. My containers are wood with air slots in the side, they get turned on a monthly basis and I have compost in four months during the summer. As it is turned a handful of fertiliser and a damping with a rose on the watering can is enough to start the heating. Placing them in direct sunlight and out of the wind will help heat up and I have lids on mine to keep direct rain from soaking them, you lift the lid and can feel the heat rising if not then it is not working.

Never put meat of anything cooked in the compost though some do, I would not risk it there is plenty of stuff you can add without that. As I said use some of your grass clippings too much will turn into a dark gluey mess so that goes in the council green bag along with brush wood which is too thick. Compost takes time, a single bin can take a year if it is a cold summer, when I load up a bin in Autumn it is with the knowledge it will take a good six months to compost. The only fast way is how the council does it build it high and wide, they shred everything and turn it weekly with JCB's it will still take six to eight weeks.

Frank.

12/05/2014 at 22:16

Are you putting enough carbon in? Paper, card etc. And don't underestimate the effect of turning it regularly and getting some air in, makes a big difference, even a stir about with a fork will help if you don't want to turn it all out.  Have fun!

15/05/2014 at 19:55

You can compost leftovers with a Bokashi composter, including meat scraps, I am told. It kind of pickles the scraps.   Our council sells them.  Or I think a special hot composter makes them safe, but these are expensive.

22/05/2014 at 20:38
I spend the occasional penny in mine.
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