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31/01/2014 at 10:01

Hiya,

My students want to build closches to protect their seedlings, but are stumped as to how to attach the fleece to the wire arches.

Does anyone know of a weatherproof glue that will stick fleece to itself/bamboo?

Thanks so much for your help,

Sarah. xx

31/01/2014 at 11:06

I don't attach it to the wire arches, drape it smoothly over them and then pin the fleece to the ground using either tent pegs or special metal hooks for that sort of thing, sold also for pinning down weed suppressant fabric. I suppose you could use clothes pegs!

31/01/2014 at 11:20

So sorry to be pedantic, but it's cloche not closche. Just thought it should be right if you're teaching, Sarah, I'm not usually the spelling police!

I use a combination of pegging the fleece to the ground, pinning it down with old bricks, and attaching with clothes pegs if it flaps about. Doesn't look elegant, but works!

I've got a commercial version where the fleece has had channels stitched across it, and the wire arches are threaded through these. Could be a combined sewing and gardening lesson!

31/01/2014 at 15:03

you can buy 5m cloches at poundland for a £1

31/01/2014 at 17:30

Really???!!! Even if they only last a season, that sounds amazing!

31/01/2014 at 19:56

Metal staples hold fleece very well.  Glue is not sensible and some of them actually "melt" fleece material.  For protecting runner beans, etc., I do as busy said and use clothes pegs to join. 

Hope that helps Sarah and good luck with your students.  Nice to have your question 

31/01/2014 at 20:09

Sarah, if you are using wire arches, where do you intend to use the bamboos?

You don't say the age of your students, but try to ensure that most of your crops mature during term-time.  It is a shame if you have to leave the garden in the summer just as you have usable crops.

The only comment I would make about metal pins (cheap in a camping shop) is that they make holes in the fleece which shortens its life considerably.

31/01/2014 at 23:56

Yes that is true landgirl, bought 2 the other day, can't turn a bargain down like that, and fleece 5m for a £1.

07/02/2014 at 21:47

Homemade cloches.

I cut 4 lengths of hosepipe each about a metre long and put short lengths of bamboo cane into each end and push them into the ground a couple of feet apart to make "hoops". Then I drape the fleece or clear plastic over the hoops and hold the edges down with bricks or scrumple them up and peg into place. Works for me.

07/02/2014 at 22:34

Hi Sarah.

 

Truly I envy you.  To be able to pass on info to eager beavers.  Sarah, in the days that I used cloches, fleece hadn't been invented.  Basically the wire frame, if that's what one would call it.  It consisted of a length of wire.  Bent halfay into a wide spanned 'V'  Upturned with the tips just bent back enough to support a pane of glass.  Now there are curved versions, and instead of glass, polythene.  A very simple method is to.  Bend into a gentle curve a suitable length of wire.  Insert the ends into the soil at both ends of your planting row. If it's a long row, then best to use a couple of intermediated wires.  Then get your polythene.  Measure out enough so asto be able to drape it over the wire frame, allowing a bit extra to be weighted down.  Then the humble desk stapler.  Fold over the ends and staple.  For fleece protection.  Drape the fleece over the subject, then simply staple the overlap.

Hope this helps.

Mike. xx

 

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