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5 messages
28/05/2013 at 21:54

Hello to whoever reads this and I'd be grateful for any advice you can offer.

I moved into a new build property recently and whilst the garden is small, we'd like to lay a lawn. I've dug out the whole space to about 100/150mm deep and have removed all the bricks, iron, glass and other materials that the builders didnt need.

Can I please have advise on what is best to use directly under the turf, and do I need to mix it with anything? Also, whats a reliable make of turf. I'd much rather pay a little more and buy a good make and not have to re-do it next year. 

Many many thanks

28/05/2013 at 23:45

Personally I'd dig in sharp sand, or horticultural sand. Aim for a 50/50 mix with the soil. You could add a little compost like 10% of the total, but you may have problems with worm castings. Most common problem with lawns is moss. Main cause is lack of drainage and shade. If you give the turf excellent drainage at it's roots, your lawn will be fairly easy to maintain and look wonderful. Ensure you take all the bigger stones out (anything 2-3" or bigger), this sounds like effort but trust me, if you do this, when it comes to aerating the lawn, (stabbing with a fork) no stones = an easy life. Good luck.

PS: you will need to give some attention every year for it to look great, however if you get the soil it has it's roots in sorted, it becomes a very easy job.

29/05/2013 at 00:01

I've done a few lawns and I'm a great believer in putting in some compost or dried manure into the soil before laying any lawn followed by a fertilizer

I prefer seed too..if you want a good lawn seed s best.  Much cheaper too

29/05/2013 at 00:33

The sharp sand is a good idea, as is removing the stones.  If you buy turves, you'll need to make sure they get plenty of water (sprinkler on half hour in morning, half hour in afternoon), or wait until September to do it.  If turfing from seed, you may want to do it in strips, and cover the bit you've just sown with fine netting, raised a few inches to stop the birds eating the seeds or grass seedlings.

29/05/2013 at 14:59

If you intend to use the lawn a fair amount a higher percentage of annual meadowgrass is better as it`s harder wearing. If it is going to be a look at only lawn plenty of bents and fescue grass in your turf is better. Rolawn always used to be the best turf to buy, not sure if it is now. If you have a lot of rubble in the garden and it drains quickly go lower on the sand to soil mixture, if it`s clay though go as high as 60/40 sand to soil. One of the most important things is to buy a good quality wide rake to get it all level and keep foot treading and re-raking until it is perfect.

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