Start a new thread

1 to 7 of 7 replies

Hi,

I've just moved house and noticed that the main house doesn't have any waterbutts on the downpipes, which is something i want to rectify, but i've never had water butts before. My lawn is 220m2 alone, plus it's alongside oaks and birches, so any watering of the lawn is also going to water those.I've no idea how much water the lawn will need, and therefore the size of the required storage, but can imagine it's not a small amount, so guessing 400-600l may do, but also aware that i'm probably too late to gain a lot this year as the winter and spring showers have been and gone.

I'm gobsmacked at how much a large waterbutt system (over £300) can cost, so looking for alternatives ( combining 5 x 100l slimlines at £25 a pop subsidised by the water company) may be a suitable way to go, and then boxing it over to increase the shade and looks? Wondering if a 1000l container might be a better bet, and would take up most of the patio..., and then being clear would definately need some shading.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/1000-Litre-1000-Ltr-IBC-Water-Storage-Container-Tank-/111350906220?pt=UK_Home_Garden_Garden_Plants_Bird_Bath_Feeder_CV&hash=item19ed07fd6c

Any ideas/suggestions for a water butt newbie?

Thanks!

ighten

We have a few IBCs dotted around .. The framing makes it really easy to clad with shiplap or similar. we have them in the shady areas of the woods with the cladding painted black - makes them practically invisible all year around.

ighten wrote (see)

We have a few IBCs dotted around .. The framing makes it really easy to clad with shiplap or similar. we have them in the shady areas of the woods with the cladding painted black - makes them practically invisible all year around.

Thanks for the feedback. I love the idea of the IBC being hidden away in a shaded area, makes sense to me. I'd have to arrange a bi-monthly water transferal scheme though to pump from a small water butt to the IBC, but that's probably worth the effort. I've got a small area of the garden currently blocked off to a shed and had planned a composter in their, i may try to extend it to include an IBC.

 

 

Welshonion

Lawns don't need water.  If they go very dry they will recover when we have autumn rains.  Most native trees don't need water either.

Put water butts on your downpipes.  You will be amazed at the amount you will collect. Then get yourself a cheap pump and you can move water all over the place.  I wouldn't sacrifice most of your patio.

 

I agree with Welshonion. The average lawn doesn't need watering.

I have 3 lawns. My soil is light andfree draining, so in a dry spell the lawns quickly getparched but soon recover with rainfall. Unless you want a bowling green, forget it.

I have a system of 7 water butts inter connected round the oil tank fed from the house roof. I never use this water for the lawns.

Advertisement

Hostafan1

I live in Devon now, I have no need to worry about water shortage: but agree, you don't need to water a lawn.

As long as the levels are the same, you can connect water butts with hosepipes acting as siphons. i.e. a length of hose is filled with water, one end is placed into one butt and the other end into another. So long as the ends stay submerged, the water level in both butts will automatically be the same. Therefore you could hide a large ibc out of the way, and run a length of hose to a smaller butt on your downpipe. when it rains, the water is automatically transferred to the ibc until both are full. (if the pipe falls out of a butt, the other one will be siphoned dry, so be careful )

Sign up or log in to post a reply