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8 messages
02/07/2013 at 20:26

Hello, my mum is having some work done in her garden and having an old shed taken down. A lot of bees were noticed going down into the old floor boards of the shed and it looks like they have a nest down there. Don't know what type of bees they were other than they were quite large and looked liked the traditional bumblies.

Just wondering what is the best course of action? Thanks for any info

02/07/2013 at 20:59

Could you leave it until the Autumn?  Or even just leave the base so they aren't disturbed. In autumn  all the bees except the new queens will die. the queens will hibernate.

03/07/2013 at 10:47

Definately be very careful as bee's are quite heavily protected these days. If they are the fat bumble-bee types, could be solitary bee's, so you could try providing a new home which they can move into?

03/07/2013 at 19:52

Thanks both, caught a glimpse of a couple today and from what I can tell they look like bumblies. Leaving it or the base is an option as we don't want to do them any harm.

Been on the bumblebees conservation site and they advocate leaving it alone as the nests don't last for long and the queen will find somewhere else to hibernate. Wasn't sure if the queen hibernates in the same nest or finds somewhere else but it looks as if she will move on.

Thanks again

04/07/2013 at 09:34

Huntertony, not sure what you mean by 'quite heavily protected'.  Bees of all types have no legal protection at all.  And if you read this forum for any length of time you will realise that some of the posters resort to chemicals as soon as their plants are threatened.

Admittedly there are less posters advocating the worst of the chemicals and sprays lately, but I'm sure many have still got the chemicals stashed away somewhere.

There was a piece in the newspaper quite recently stating that the chemicals remain in the soil for a long time, so the valuable beasties are not safe yet.

04/07/2013 at 10:12

 Rather than destroy the nest, you could use a large shovel to pick up the entire nest and move it to a  sheltered spot in the garden similar to their current abode.As they are under a shed floor, covering them with a box and waterproof roof should suffice.

If they are living in the ground, dig a shallow hole, cover it with a flower pot and ensure they have side access for their workers. 

This should be done in the evening at about dusk so that the foragers do not 'lose' their home. It is an easy thing to do and will ensure your pollinators continue to thrive!

 

04/07/2013 at 14:15

They do get lost very easily. I have one at the base of my garage and I have found a few wondering around the garage unable to find their hole since I'd opened the door. I usher them out and close the door and hope they try again. You see them looking around as they leave as if thinking 'everyone remember where we parked' , it's very cute.

04/07/2013 at 17:27
Welshonion wrote (see)

Huntertony, not sure what you mean by 'quite heavily protected'.  Bees of all types have no legal protection at all.  And if you read this forum for any length of time you will realise that some of the posters resort to chemicals as soon as their plants are threatened.

Admittedly there are less posters advocating the worst of the chemicals and sprays lately, but I'm sure many have still got the chemicals stashed away somewhere.

There was a piece in the newspaper quite recently stating that the chemicals remain in the soil for a long time, so the valuable beasties are not safe yet.

 

Is that true? Were they ever protected at one time? At school (many moons ago) we were told never to kill bee's because they were protected and that has always stuck!

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