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Hi, I would like to putr a pond in my small back garden, using something like an old trug or washing bowl.

how deep and wide would you suggest the receptacle, as I do not have much space, but want to encourage more wildlife?



Sorry-but this wont work as a permanent feature-just nowhere big enough-a pond needs to be well- pond-size-what you will end up with is a bowl of green stagnant water- probably with a few dead bugs or worse


I've a gardening book with it in. It's got a picture of a large plastic bucket of water saying,"plant with dwarf or miniature varieties of nymphaea and eichhornia crassipes"

And spotted this:

Really, for a pond to stay clear and healthy and not freeze in winter it should be at least 18" deep in the deepest bit, but it can have shallower shelves as well. It should be big enough to put oxygenating plants and some other pond plants in it. About a metre wide minimum. Otherwise it will go green or stagnant and smelly after a while and will have to be cleaned out regularly. Sotongeoff is right if you want a permanent pond and not just a sort of temporary flower arrangement.


Gary Hobson

Even the smallest containers of water are helpful to wildlife. There are no limits.

A container just a couple of inches is deep is sufficient for frogs to lay spawn.

A small basin of water, kept ice free during the day, is useful to birds in Winter.

I have an upturned dustbin lid in a depression on the the ground, containing a few stones and water, which is used by birds and small animals.

If you were to use a washing up bowl, then I'd include a big stone, in the bowl at the side, so that small animals could get in and out easily. And birds could stand on the stone, to drink and wash.


Yes, frogs will spawn in a small amount of water if there is nowhere more suitable around, but what if it freezes solid, or dries up?  And what will the tadpoles have to eat? 

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