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28/01/2014 at 09:21

Hello

Interested to know if the fruit on the Vibrnum Opulus are eaten by birds. If so can you recommend an evergreen variety. I want to plant it in clay soil to cover a 6 foot fence.

28/01/2014 at 09:30

Viburnum opulus berries are good bird food and there are evergreen viburnums. The evergreen ones don't have those lovely berries.  Consider Cotoneaster lacteus instead

http://apps.rhs.org.uk/plantselector/plant?plantid=565

Mine looks lovely with berries right now, the blackbirds will strip them very soon

28/01/2014 at 09:39

Both would suit those conditions very well. I have a great fondness for the viburnum even though it is deciduous.

28/01/2014 at 21:55

Hello nutcutlet, thanks for letting me know that the evergreen Viburnum Opulus don't have berries.I have 2 very large evergreen Cotoneaster Cornubia that are full of red berries right now and as you said the the blackbirds are having feast of them. Decided to go for Viburnum Opulus Compactum which is deciduous.

28/01/2014 at 22:05

Lovely plant if you're sure it's big enough. 

Those Cotoneaster 'Cornubia' are lovely aren't they.

28/01/2014 at 23:17

Viburnum davidii and Viburnum tinus are both evergreen and have dark blue berries. I don't know if the birds like them though! V. davidii is quite compact, while V. tinus can get as big as V.opulus.

28/01/2014 at 23:56

Landgirl100 I have Viburnum Tinus but never noticed birds eating the berries, know birds prefer red berries.

Nutcutlet you are right, the Viburnum Opulus Compactum is too small for what I am looking for, any suggestions.  the Cotoneaster Colnubia is a beautiful shrub/tree but needs pruning which I hate to do to keep it under control.

29/01/2014 at 08:59

Hi Ahmadmirza.

Viburnum opulus, the native guelder rose, is excellent. Various cultivars (different varieties) of this have been developed but are not as good as the original species. Avoid any with 'roseum' or 'sterile' after the name, or 'the snowball bush. They all have much larger flowers but no berries

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viburnum_opulus

 

 

 

 

 

29/01/2014 at 14:26

There isn't an evergreen V. opulus. There's loads of good shrubs for berries, V.o. is one but not evergreen, Pyracnatha c. Cadrou is great for berries and birds love it. They stripped mine clean over Christmas week. Holly and ivy are good native evergreens for birds and wildlife. I would advise to look up what is native then check if evergreen and if has berries before buying anything. Google is a wonderful tool.

29/01/2014 at 18:20

Hello nutcutlet

Thank for the info, few years ago I bought a Wildlife hedge which was supposed to consist of 3 Guelder Roses, however I believe they are just plain rose bushes. I prune the hedge twice a year so they never get to the berry producing stage so can't be certain, that is why I am set on getting a Guelder Rose.

Hi Jim

I already have all the shrubs you mentioned, the blackbirds have just devoured all the berries on the Pyracnatha and now are well thru the berries on the Cotoneaster bush/trees. I will try Google, as you said they are very good.

29/01/2014 at 18:38

Common names are very confusing. Guelder rose isn't a rose and looks nothing like one. No prickles for a start. It's not even in the same family. I don't know where it got the name guelder rose

I'm always very pleased with mine, lovely autumn colour as well

29/01/2014 at 20:02

Agree nut. I enjoy the autumn colour on mine more than anything else I think, probably because I have one near my window and when I have the light on at night it looks really otherworldly. I've got a load of hard wood cuttings from mine this year. I can't get enough of them and the birds strip the berries from them very quickly. The tree they strip the berries from first is the Rowan. The minute they're red, they're gone, not the S. vilmorinii though, that's getting grafted over this year, I've had enough of it, it hardly ever sets any fruit, it looks sparse and wispy, it's a weird shape the berries that I did get are still there untouched. I've got a Sorbe, S. domestica, I'm going to have a go at grafting or budding that in the hope I can get some fruit before I'm too old to care. Not all the grafts took from the Edulis but all the chip buds took so maybe that's the best way to go and you get more for you efforts. 

29/01/2014 at 20:12

The birds are quick off the mark with rowan berries. I have S. hupehensis which berried very well this year. I thought the birds weren't interested then suddenly they found them and stripped it in a day. 

I've never tried grafting and budding, everything comes from seed. 

I might try some hardwood cuttings from the V. opulus, I never find seedlings about.

29/01/2014 at 22:00

Which cultivars of Viburnum opulus do you two have. I am going to try and find the cultivar corns, it should grow tall enough to cover my fence. Our council plant Rowan trees in the streets and they make such a mess I've gone off them and never had one. In fact I've never seen birds eat the berries, maybe that is because the berries are yellow.

29/01/2014 at 23:03

I don't have a cultivar. Viburnum opulus is a native species of tree. This is what I grow and I expect Jim does as well.

http://www.bucknur.com/acatalog/product_10194.html

garden centres will sell all sorts of cultivars but the basic species is the best. This is what evolved naturally and hasn't been developed by man. Plants with large double flowers and no berries are pretty useless for wildlife.

If you do decide to get one I can recommend Buckingham Nurseries as reliable company. I think it's where mine came from, 20 years or so ago.

29/01/2014 at 23:48
nutcutlet wrote (see)

The birds are quick off the mark with rowan berries. I have S. hupehensis which berried very well this year. I thought the birds weren't interested then suddenly they found them and stripped it in a day. 

I've never tried grafting and budding, everything comes from seed. 

I might try some hardwood cuttings from the V. opulus, I never find seedlings about.

I found one, it was quite big, it must have seeded the first year after planting unless it was coincidence. (The stuff I've had come up that I just bought is weird, like some cosmic joke. .) There's loads of V. o. just a mile away. I live near Durham Wildlife HQ 

Grafting and budding is really not hard. You have to follow a couple of basic rules then it looks after itself. You should give it a try if there's a variety of something you feel you made a mistake with then graft it over. You get a big head start on growing a new one. 

29/01/2014 at 23:50
Ahmadmirza wrote (see)

Which cultivars of Viburnum opulus do you two have. I am going to try and find the cultivar corns, it should grow tall enough to cover my fence. Our council plant Rowan trees in the streets and they make such a mess I've gone off them and never had one. In fact I've never seen birds eat the berries, maybe that is because the berries are yellow.

Yeah, the birds won't touch the yellow ones, 'they're not ripe' as far as the birds are concerned. I think that's why they like the Cardinal Royal so much, it's very red. 

30/01/2014 at 12:41

Thanks nutcutlet for the website, have contacted Buckingham Nurseries, they and their supplier do not have a large Viburnum opulus, only 2 foot ones for hedging. Will try our local nursery, if they also don't have any, I will get the small ones and replace the roses in my hedge.

30/01/2014 at 14:17

Good idea. 2 foot plants will grow in no time and easier to insert into the hedge than big ones.

30/01/2014 at 18:09

Sorry, mist the bit about you asking about cultivars. Yeah, as nut said, mine are wild, un-named plants. You could probably pick them up from your local nursery in the hedging section. They are in mine and come five to a pot and work out about £2.00 each or you can get them from Ashridge trees, Hedges Direct which is a sister site I think of Buckingham nursery or hedge nursery in potted or bare root plus many more as heeding stock for sometimes pence. Have a look around where you live though you can also probably find them in newer council plantings. I'm sure nobody would mind you taking some hard wood cuttings. Take them about 8-12" long and treat like like any other hardwood cutting. 

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