13 messages
14/01/2014 at 22:48

Hello fellow wildlife fans! 

I am currently a Masters student studying at Teesside University, UK and my class mates and I are putting together a multimedia campaign to encourage people to conserve wildlife in their back gardens.

We intend to provide information sourced from experts on how to easily conserve nature in no more than 1 square meter of your garden so that even people who have limited outside space can take part.

We will provide this information through a blog, videos, Facebook and Twitter. We will also encourage you to send in pictures, stories and to communicate with other users via the Facebook and Twitter pages to give the campaign a community feel.

We are hoping to have the campaign up and running by February, but for now, we are in the market research stage, which is where you come in! 

We want to know what makes you want to conserve wildlife? Why do you think it's important? And what would encourage you to take part in our campaign? Would informational videos be appealing to you or perhaps information packs so that children can join in too?

I'm really interested to know what your opinions are on wildlife conservation and what kinds of things would make you want to help the wildlife in your garden!

15/01/2014 at 06:58

I'm more interested in wildlife in my garden now i know it is there.  And the more i garden, and the more time i spend outside, actively engaging with my surroundings, the more i discover, and the more interested i get.  Its a virtuous circle really.

15/01/2014 at 08:31

I would echo chicky's comments. We began by planting for bees, but of course so much more came into the garden for the plants. It is brilliant and really enriches my life. Good luck with the campaign.

15/01/2014 at 09:31

From a campaign likes yours I'd want

  • a monthly email telling me what to look out for in terms of what wildlife would be around with interesting facts especially the rarer animals in the UK and invasive species that need reporting / are putting our own native animals at risk
  • Also in the email / on a website ... what jobs would need doing in both my wildlife patch and the garden in general to be animal friendly (i.e. this weeks project - build a insect box, make a leaf pile for hibernating animals, sow x y z....)
  • Also in the email / on a website ... what events are on (i.e. RSPB big bird watch) that I could get involved in

I try to encourage wildlife into my garden because I feel it important to make a contribution to helping animals when we are putting ever more pressure on the natural environments that they live / lived in with our big housing plans and concrete cities. I am aware how important it is to have bees and such like to pollinate and thus grow our food.

15/01/2014 at 11:41

Why conserve wild life? Because it is all linked in a cycle and somewhere in that cycle there are bees. Without bees the human race dies, apparently within about 3 years. It is as simple as that.

16/01/2014 at 19:07

Won best wildlife garden in Dorset in 2012 but have to add extra wildlife features to apply to win again which is difficult as when I won it was said little could be done to improve the garden for wildlife as I had everything on their check list. A pond is one of the best (I already have 3 of them) bug hotels made from odd bits of wood odd bricks and odd roof tiles etc (easy in a 1m square) but to further increase my chance if I enter this year I have dug up a large area of lawn and sown an annual wildflower meadow mix from Pictorial Meadows. I tried this out last year on a 1m x  2m bit of soil and the result was amazing. It started to flower in early spring and went on until the end of October and I never saw less than 8 bees on it and 4 butterflies at any one time. Most of the time it was a lot more. You can even sew these flowers in pots. See the Pictorial Meadows website at www.pictorialmeadows.co.uk.

16/01/2014 at 19:53
19/01/2014 at 13:02

Sorry if I'm a bit late to the party.  I echo what the others have already said.  My garden is currently a huge mess and not particularly good for wildlife (its all long grass), but it is being dealt with this year.  I'm hoping to develop a garden which is attractive, interesting and wildlife friendly. 

As someone who is new to gardening (and comes from a family of non-gardeners) I would find it useful to see examples of how wildlife friendly ideas can be incorporated into a small family garden.  Things like wildflower meadows, ponds, hedgehog hideouts etc. For example, I would love to have a wildflower meadow but haven't yet worked out where I could put it so that it will work within the garden design.  It would also be useful to have ideas which would suit shady gardens.  Knowing my parents, it would be great to see ideas of how to incorporate these ideas into an attractive but very low maintenance garden.  If you want to encourage non-gardeners to have a go I think the key words are attractive and low maintenance. 

Good luck with the project.

19/01/2014 at 13:40

Why do i want to help wildlife?

Just seeing all the creatures which thrive in a wildlife friendly garden come and go is sheer delight.

It's not difficult, so why not do it.

We all benefit from it.

23/01/2014 at 18:45

Where would we be if we didn't have wildlife, I get so much joy seeing the bees and butterflies and anything else that ventures into my garden. We humans are making their lives very hard, we take away their habitats and just don't seem to care.

I hope i'm helping on a small scale with my garden. I have 2 ponds, bird feeders and plants that will help feed,also Bug hotels and bird boxes

23/01/2014 at 20:48

When I started to notice what was already in my garden I became more interested in Wildlife Gardening.  The more I provided for the wildlife in my garden the more wildlife seemed to enjoy my garden.  I regularly record the birds/bees/butterflies/moths for various organisations and have been amazed at what lives around about me.  My children have become involved too and have learned so much.  Through the wildlife my interest in gardening has developed - I want to grow what the bees/butterflies etc. want, not because I like it.  If a plant is of no use to some member of the wildlife community I very seldom have it in my garden.  Its not a good plant (in my eyes) if it doesn't have an insect on it!

23/01/2014 at 21:00

The first thing i ever did 15 yrs ago was a 16x20 ft pond and over the yrs it's silted up slighty and on it's own i now have iris and other pond plants that arrived with the birds.

lots of garden birds that wash and feed in the waterfall,beetles, boatmen, dragonfly nypmph and others that i don't know what they are. I do this as it brings my garden alive at the cost of a home built pond made out of curtain siders off a old waggon, cost of £ 70.

We have had two pair of ducks and mallards every year for the past six yrs, but they do get a bit much with 14 babies each, they wreck the pond every yr, but it always perks back up again.

23/01/2014 at 21:45

Hi Hannah - Just to wish you success with your project.  Last year I began a small

wildflower garden on a private patch of lawn near to my home, which I'm hoping to

expand this year.  I loved seeing all the bees and butterflies on the wild flowers 

I'd grown.  In my back garden I have two hedgehogs, one little woodmouse which I

feed on peanuts, lots of different birds which have grown very tame during these

winter months and one toad!  

email image
13 messages